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Check for grubs curled in soil at base of plants. Keep garden clean of debris and plant residue. Keep garden weed-free. Use cardboard collars around seedlings. Lydia’s box garden. We had this exact same thing happen in our garden here in Prince George, BC and after talking to a local soil expert, doing some research as well as an experiment, came to the same conclusion. It is aminopyralid poisoning. Our potatoes and tomatoes are the most seriously affected with the mutant leaves that look like fiddleheads. Any legumes just did not grow at all and neither did the cucumbers or melons. It has been very disheartening as this was the first year I had started all my own seedlings as well. We have begun turning our small city lot into a permaculture garden to tea people what you can do in a small space. You can check out our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/PermaPress/. Because our yard is small we cannot produce enough organic matter ourselves so were excited to find a source of manure from a friend who has horses. He buys hay locally but we have since found out that almost all of the people who sell hay in the area spray their crops with herbicide for thistles, clover, etc. Here we thought we were doing such a good thing for our soil and it turns out we poisoned it instead! We shared what we experienced with local growers at our local farmers’ market. Some were aware of the problem but others were not and this could impact their livelihood in a huge way. Suddenly, things that have been safe to use on your garden can no longer be considered to be safe. It is not just the hay and the straw but the manure as well. With increasing amounts of mole hills on her lawn and moles now burrowing under her flowerbed, Tiffany Daneff looks at ways of controlling the moles in her garden. “The biggest lesson I learned from Michael…is that first gardens sleep, then creep and finally leap,” she said, because gardens change as they grow. “The second biggest lesson I learned from Michael is that there are no mistakes, but there are learning lessons. You plant something in the wrong spot, and you can dig it up and try it elsewhere, or try something different next time.” Well why not give small space gardening a go? Almost anything is suitable to grow in small spaces and here’s how you can do it. 2015 saw an eruption of mini volcanos. It’s the warm and wet weather that encourages them. And not just in the fields. There’s been way too much mole action in the garden too, and I’m fed up. One hill I could cope with. Two, even. But now there are three – as well as plenty of signs that he/she/they are digging under the flower beds. Which is not good. Not least because once they begin to breed there could be loads more. So leaving well alone was not an option. I wanted the mole/s out. Do you long for a beautiful garden but hate weeding? Are you intimidated by roses or worried about watering? Do your neighbor’s trees block your sunlight? Is your outdoor space too big? Too small? An awkward shape? Or maybe you just don’t know where to begin…  Do you long for a beautiful garden but hate weeding? Are you intimidated by roses or worried about watering? Do your neighbor’s trees block your sunlight? Is your outdoor space too big? Too small? An awkward shape? Or maybe you just don’t know where to begin…  Vegepod is a garden bed with a greenhouse effect to protect from pests. Photo: Vegepod IDC’s ‘Three Platforms’ definition30 (first: mainframe, second: client/server, third: mobile/social) gives us some insight into just how important any ethical obligations in the walled-garden ecosystems will be over time – each platform is typified by orders of magnitude more applications that might be used by consumers, thus increasing the number of potential vectors from which users might be adversely impacted. As such, it will likely require ongoing vigilance from users and independent security/data protection groups, as well as the likes of Apple and Google in order to limit user exposure to fraud, and this is an area that will undoubtedly receive increasing attention as smartphones and other highly portable computing devices grow in use, particularly where such use supplants older generation services. To be honest, this whole issue bothers me very, very deeply. Composted manure is cheap, it’s natural (most of the time), and is readily available. If we can no longer use it on our gardens, what then? The same goes for hay mulch… I can hardly stand the thought of being stripped of these options due to herbicides. I’m still ruminating on these thoughts… I’ll share more in an upcoming post. I do not know if you would even have a possibly source available near you being in a prairie. However, perhaps look into the Back to Eden style of no till garden. The method uses chipped/shredded wood(tree trimmings) as a mulch and with adding regular compost, which gets distributed down through the chips, it is wonderful(so far at least) and does great things. I use woodchips too, Paul Gautschi gardening method, but I experienced much of what Jill and others have (so thank you Jill for blogging your experience). In retrospect, I need to add more chips during the year like you do, because they do compost during winter-spring so that by summer, there’s no longer at least 4″ of chips, such that the soil below got very dry still especially during our prolonged hot spell in PA. The very bad news is the chemtrails above in our skies, containing metals like aluminum which stunts plant growth. The metals rain down and pollute. Now Paul thinks the chips filter out pollutants, so I may add much more than 4″ next year. Still, the soil takes time to build up healthiness with this method. Good question– we have had slightly less rain this year– but I’ve watered sufficiently. And we’ve had other dry years where the garden still thrived, so it’s hard to say for sure. Solution: While there is no one-size-fits-all solution for pests, there is one thing you can do to reduce the chances of your landscape becoming an all-you-can-eat buffet: garden in raised beds. While this won’t solve all your problems, a raised bed helps deter small- and medium-sized animals. Add a fence or netting to deter deer and birds as well.  What is the problem with your garden? I have a constant battle with weeds in my garden. Epson salt provides the plant with the magnesium it needs to produce the “green” in the leaves. Put a small circle of ES around the plant. Don’t forget to water it in. That way the plant can take what it needs when it needs it. I use the triage method and cut those dead or dying leaves off the plant. With regards to my tomato plants this year, I cut off leaves at the lower end of the plant and buried the roots deeper then before. In some cases I planted the stem of the plant on it’s side. This way it gave the plant more area to produce roots. You should see the stems this season,larger then I’ve seen before. Two fingers thick, easily. With regards to the mulching,I was told that saw dust robbed the soil of nitrogen. However are saying that and purchasing a truck load we were committed to using the saw dust and continue to do so. Saw no evidence of that happening. Mulching still keeps the weeds down to a min, as well as protecting our plants from the hot sun. We have raised beds and at least half of the bed is composed of leaves from our back yard We use compost that was a 50/50 mix of leaves and grass,then topped it off with a 0.05 mixture of compost and manure. Then we added an evergreen mixture of top soil to bring the level of the soil to our desired level. I know everyone has their preferences, but we use miracle-grow once a week and our garden is thicker,greener and taller every year. We also have started to make a compost tea. We’ll get back with those results later on. One other thought,at the end of last years season we took what was left from our compost pile and spread it over our raised beds. We think that has helped out too. While it seems that extra work has paid off in that area of gardening soil development, garden pest such as Japanese beetles are eating up our rose bush’s,blackberries and now they are visiting our green bean plants. Hand picking was fine when there was a few, but this year they brought there whole family for a visit. FYI- Hand picking, Shop van and neeme oil. beginning in the morning. Some success. This year we introduced 1500 ladybugs into our garden. We also left alone wasp,bees,spiders and grasshoppers. Need to keep an open eye on the leaf hoppers! Want to keep the garden chemical free as much as we can. Did not mean for this to be so long,sorry about that. Anyway good luck and good gardening to you all from Southern Patriots Victory gardens in the homeland of America. Be prepared for what’s to come! Good Day mate ! SP Eron Plus Atlant Gel Testogen Testogen Eron Plus Masculin Active Testogen Masculin Active eracto power up premium

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