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These links will help you with some shade gardening ideas. Mexican Feather Grass does lie down. If you don’t like this affect, you can give it a haircut with a few inches of the top to prevent flopping. It probably looks best if cut once or twice during the season. Also, be sure to pull out dead foliage new foliage emerges. However, if everything is pulling out easily, then the plant didn’t root well. Provide a well-drained soil (not too compact) and water regularly during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Reduce watering after establishment. In terms of the sage, we haven’t heard of mole problems. Moles tend to eat grubs in lawns. Voles, however, love spring perennials. If you are concerned, we’d suggest raised garden beds or dig a trench around the area that you want protected. My garden is too small I, too, know your pain and despair. We live on the western edge of Wyoming at 6000′. Our sons raise cattle, so left-over hay and manure from the cows and horses was easy to obtain. About mid way through the 2014 gardening season, after mulching my peas they just stopped. Hmm, must have been the heat. The beans were just a fair crop that year. 2015, no potatoes, no beans, no peas. They all came up beautifully, but when they started to put out roots – they became stunted, yellowed, twisted, and eventually died. The corn wasn’t bothered. Nor the pumpkin. I thought slugs, virus, disease, too much water. By the end of 2015, research was pointing to contamination. This year, began the same way. Transplants were healthy until put into the garden. Seeds germinate then look awful. After much research – I stopped using the manure tea (it seemed to be the worst culprit – maybe because it is concentrated). Planted all the radish seed I had. The ones I didn’t pick are the size of large potatoes and up to 4′ tall. Started more brassica transplants and planted them all over the garden. Interestingly, where I planted radishes or brassicas next to the peas, the peas actually produced a few peas and did not die immediately. Also, putting fermented molasses water on the potatoes seemed to help a little. We are now looking at cover crops as a way to help remediate. And all the wood stove ash will be dumped in the garden this winter. Very interested in this phenomenon. I’m in Virginia and just about every gardener in my neighborhood is complaining about their tomatoes this year. My sister who is a veteran gardener commented to me that she got her first ripe tomato in mid-July. She anticipated the usual progression of ripening tomatoes but the ripening just stopped. It took several weeks more for the tomatoes to ripen. Extractive agriculture has seen the long-term, persistent removal of these broad spectrum trace minerals with no replacement. In fact, it could be argued that most plants no longer have the associated hormonal support to achieve their genetic potential. The exception is the seaweed plant, which exists in a soup comprising the perfect balance of all minerals. Consequently, this plant contains forty times more of these hormonal helpers than land plants. What does this mean for this sea plant? Well, it is the fastest-growing plant on the planet, producing 30 cm of new growth every day. We can boost our hormone-deficient, garden plants with seaweed fertiliser. In this context, kelp becomes an essential supplement for a healthy, vigorous, food-producing garden. Those are your only options. If you love your yard/garden, suck it up and exterminate them yourself. If you can’t bear the thought of killing a mole, then you’d better get used to having your yard tilled up at random by blind, subterranean rodents. The critical points occur when $\dfrac{dC}{dx} = 0$: \[ \begin{align*} \dfrac{dC}{dx} = 0 &= -\dfrac{600}{x^2} + 2 \\[8px] -2 &= -\dfrac{600}{x^2} \\[8px] x^2 &= \dfrac{600}{2} \\[8px] &= 300 \\[8px] x &= \sqrt{300} \end{align*} \] Note that we choose the positive square root since the width x cannot be negative. Also note that we could have a critical point where $\dfrac{dC}{dx} = -\dfrac{600}{x^2} + 2$ is undefined, which occurs when $x=0$. That answer makes no physical sense, though, since then Sam’s garden would have zero area. We thus continue our analysis with the single critical point $$x = \sqrt{300}$$ “I must admit, I thought planting beds in our garden would create a high maintenance garden. I couldn’t have been more wrong” I’d like a wild garden As much as it pains me to say this, I would NOT use any more hay on your garden until you can absolutely, 100% verify the hay or field it came from has not been sprayed with any sort of herbicide. Straw and manure are both completely unsafe now and I recommended in my composting book that gardeners now need to stay away from both except under very narrow restrictions, such as they grew it themselves or got manure from an animal that has not been fed any hay from outside sources. Really frustrating. I am sooo grateful for this post! I have had “bad luck” with my tomatos for the past 3 to 4 years, and I could not for the life of me figure out what I was doing wrong! Now I see that I had done the same as you had, adding manure (from my neighbors aged cow manure pile) to our garden. I used to grow beautiful tomatos, and beamed with pride at my quarts of lovely canned tomatos lined up on my shelf, waiting to be enjoyed in the midst of winter! I guess pride came before the fall! LOL! I have tried everything I could think of to try to deal with the problem, even moving all my tomatos to big pots on my porch, BUT I was still using soil from my garden! AhHa! My mom had a bumper crop of tomatos this year, using big pots on her porch, but the only soil she used was Miracle Gro Moisture Control soil, and I am going to do this next year! I don’t like having to buy soil when we have access to all the free manure to amend our soil, but, in light of this info, I think that we may have to, at least for our tomato plants. I have not noticed any of my other plants having the problems like the tomatos, so at least my garden will not be totally unusable next summer. Thank you so much for all the info!!! 🙂 Blessings, and Happy Fall! 🙂 How about adding VOLES to the list of garden Pests. I have one that has eaten everyone of my marigolds and chwews off one whole patch of Bee Balm. Now the beast is eating my tomatoes to get all of the seeds. Yes it is a vole because I have seen him or them scurrying in an around my planting beds. I have put out three live catch traps and all have remained empty. I put out glue boards up next to the foundation of the house and he kicked dirt all over them. I put out poison and it hasn’t been touched in two weeks. These thinks are the bane of my summer gardening. My biggest problem with my garden is trees! We have a shelterbelt around our whole acreage that includes several rows of trees which are beautiful but we get no sun! Garden Gift Hub is one of the most thoughtful and interesting places on the web to find original and useful gardening and nature inspired products. I have a lack of time for upkeep and need a garden that will be somewhat self-sufficient. Dudeni, if it’s thick clay and north facing, I’d consider going grass less. You’ll never get a good lawn with those conditions. You’ll be permanently fighting moss and bad drainage. Your problem isn’t easily rectified and lack of sun is something you can’t solve. I’d seriously consider a different style of garden. 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