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Does anyone have experience using chemical-free grass clippings as mulch in the garden? Good idea or not so much? I’m daunted by the garden I’ve inherited One of the most common questions I get asked as I traverse the country hosting garden workshops is, “what do I do about possums?” I have trouble with weeds and brush in the garden. I hope this book could help me with these problem As you can see from the attached photos, we require some privacy by the low fence, but would like to keep the garden bed as you approach from the street side (seen on the right in the photograph). We’re not worried about keeping the grass – paving and gravel are fine. We look forward to seeing what you can come up with for us. Joan and Jim Gooch, Tauranga How about adding VOLES to the list of garden Pests. I have one that has eaten everyone of my marigolds and chwews off one whole patch of Bee Balm. Now the beast is eating my tomatoes to get all of the seeds. Yes it is a vole because I have seen him or them scurrying in an around my planting beds. I have put out three live catch traps and all have remained empty. I put out glue boards up next to the foundation of the house and he kicked dirt all over them. I put out poison and it hasn’t been touched in two weeks. These thinks are the bane of my summer gardening. If rock gardening is not your cup of tea, you might consider the xeriscape as a practical alternative to more traditional yard designs. Although xeriscaping is associated with drought-plagued areas, don’t underestimate the benefits it can bring to yards far-removed from the desert. You can save yourself time and money by planting low-maintenance, drought-tolerant perennials, in addition to grouping plants with similar irrigation needs together in your yard. Do painted walls cheer up a garden? In her latest book, The Problem with My Garden, she offers savvy solutions, insightful advice and inspiration for dealing with specific gardening problems. Read on to learn more about this Laurence King Publishing book and enter to win one of 3 copies! If you want to know more, or if there’s a gardening topic you’re having a problem with and want help and advice, then send an e-mail to: info@gardenforumhorticulture.co.uk Being in touch with nature improves your health and overall happiness. It is very relaxing to do things in nature and natural experiences can reduce stress and leave us feeling peaceful. There is no better way to get in touch with nature and natural rhythms than growing and caring for your own food. You don’t have to have a garden or even a yard, you can grow beautiful plants on your balcony or even in your living room. Even a few plants will produce a good amount of food for you to eat or share with friends and family. Our new home has similar garden lawn issues. If you can afford it employ prolawn. so what about the garden that won’t ‘develope ‘ root crops?? This was an interesting possibility that came up when I started talking with my local gardening neighbor. Animal manures can be high in salts, which can cause issues when compost with high-levels of salt is added to a vegetable garden. However, I ruled out salt in my compost for these reasons: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/vgen/the-layout-of-your-vegetable-garden.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/vgen/layout-options-for-gardens.htm Hi, sounds like sparrowhawk and not local cats to blame then! I was upset thinking the cat had got it for no other reason than to play with it as they certainly aren’t hungry(unless they are feral cats) as you say its nature and sparrowhawk has to eat. i find it hard with cats as its not for food, its just for fun, know that’s how cats are and don’t like them because of it! They wreak havoc on the natural wildlife and poo in your garden to boot! 🙂 Solution: While there is no one-size-fits-all solution for pests, there is one thing you can do to reduce the chances of your landscape becoming an all-you-can-eat buffet: garden in raised beds. While this won’t solve all your problems, a raised bed helps deter small- and medium-sized animals. Add a fence or netting to deter deer and birds as well.  So … you’ve been reading my garden columns and I’ve convinced you that if a former news anchor can grow a garden on a balcony, how hard can it be? Here’s where all the answers are.  Well okay maybe not ALL the answers but if you’ve got a gardening problem then our Organic Problem Solver section is a good place to start.  Just select one of the sections to get started. Once again, it is always better to have as many different plants in the blend as feasible, in recognition of the “more the merrier” principle. A good home garden cover crop blend might include ryegrass, barley, wheat, lucerne, three clovers, daikon radish, kale and silverbeet. You will note that all species are edible here and you could easily snip as required for a chlorophyll-packed addition to your green smoothie. You could even juice the young wheatgrass and barley grass at the height of their antioxidant powers. The key to your small-space urban gardening success has a lot to do with the types of pots or planters you select. Photo: Vegepod Wow, I am sorry to hear about your garden! I have also been using the deep mulch method for several years, but with our own hay, which hasn’t had herbicides on it other than the fast dissipating round up used on spots. I hadn’t had this issue, but I have been very mindful of it. I’ve had many more issues with the grass growing after the hay breaks down. It literally doesn’t matter how deep I put the mulch, we will have a bunch of weeds and grass. But the soil is rich! We live in southern Mississippi. We have plenty of stuff growing everywhere. You might do better with using the grass you cut out of your yard. Good morning. I have the same problem and have not used the same products as you. My veggies have been very small and take longer to grow. I have spoken with many growers even those with roadside stands. We are all having the same problem. I’ve been fortunate to have produced more than some of the others. I do have a container garden. But have the curling leaves and small produce. Just thought I’d pass along a little extra info for you. So: you either 1) love moles enough to leave them alone, in which case they’ll constantly dig up your yard/ruin your garden, or 2) you like your lawn/garden without mole tunnels and mounds MORE than you love moles, which means getting rid of the moles by either trapping/re-homing them (which, as I said, will kill them 99 times out of 100) or setting kill traps. At first I just thought it was coincidence and that I simply lost the gamble this year… (Because we all know that homesteading, and especially gardening, is a bit of a gamble. Or maybe a game of Russian Roulette rather…) This week our columnist Lydia Harvey shows us how easy it is to start a garden – even when you don’t have a lot of space. My garden competes with the view “We want this book to be a go-to resource rather than just sit on a coffee table and look pretty,” Ballinger said. “If you’ve never had a garden, we want you to start at the beginning and leisurely understand all the steps.” last year I had something eating my cantaloupe , for every 6 it got I got 2 not good odds there. I thought it was a mole because there is a hole in the garden box (fenced in) and inside of the fence are 3 12×12 garden boxes . there are what I had always been told are mole trails through the yard kind of a country setting with creek down over the hill. But I see you say they primarily eat insects and grubs so what would be eating my cantaloupe ? If it didn’t eat so many I wouldn’t mind oh tomatoes too, but the ratio me to them is not even close to fair, and what ever it is has to go. what do you suggest is eating everything and what should I do? also could it be rabbits and the mole trails are just coincidental? eracto VigRX Zevs BeMass Tonus Fortis Maca peruana Celuraid Muscle TestX Core power up premium Masculin Active

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