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3. Your book features 57 gardening dilemmas and solutions for those dilemmas. How did you determine which dilemmas to include? Were they based on personal experience or did you survey a lot of gardeners to find the most common dilemmas? Is a follow-up book in the works with more gardening dilemmas? There are issues which come up again and again, like ‘My yard is too long and narrow’. I tend to write for people who are not horticultural experts but are design-aware (like me) and I see gardens on these terms. For a while I was gardening for a book publisher whose long, narrow garden was the length of a city block. It was difficult to rationalize the space. When I saw designer Chris Moss’s London garden, which is compartmentalized in a clever way, it stuck in my mind and was the first ‘problem’ to go into the book. Even if it *were* possible to deter moles from tunneling your lawn or garden by tarring corncobs, planting gum in the ground without touching it, or setting up pinwheel wind-farms—which it most definitely isn’t—all you’ve done is solve your problem at the expense of introducing a problem for your neighbors. Which is a crappy thing to do to someone who lives next door to you. Having a variety of herbs growing in the garden means you can easily pick and add them straight into food that is being prepared. Once again, it is always better to have as many different plants in the blend as feasible, in recognition of the “more the merrier” principle. A good home garden cover crop blend might include ryegrass, barley, wheat, lucerne, three clovers, daikon radish, kale and silverbeet. You will note that all species are edible here and you could easily snip as required for a chlorophyll-packed addition to your green smoothie. You could even juice the young wheatgrass and barley grass at the height of their antioxidant powers. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/shade/shade-tolerant-flowers.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/testing-soil.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/improving-garden-soil.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/mulch/choosing-garden-mulch.htm Most people will take some pride in their gardens to one degree or another. Of course, some will be keener than others to show off their green fingers, and will want to create a spectacle of colour through the addition of flowers and a well-manicured lawn. I garden in raised beds in a suburban neighborhood. All six of my tomato plants did this last year. Couldn’t figure out why, since they had come from two different nurseries. Replanted tomatoes in the same spot, but late in the season, and they were fine. This year the tomatoes are going great, but the leaves of the potatoes in a wooden barrel curled in the same way. Few blossoms and zero potatoes. The really scary thing about this is that the only thing I had added to the tomato bed last year was manure from the big box store. And the potato barrel the year had mostly bagged garden soil, again from the big box store. When even the bagged, name brand products are contaminated, we have a very large problem that needs a lot more attention drawn to it. This can be very frustrating! We have articles on Gardening Know How that will help address some of the common garden pests and even uncommon ones! i just got a raised pnalter .3 5 and 22in tall. I plan on growing herbs in it (maybe a vegetable, too). What kind of soil/mix of soil should i use to fill it.a cheaper version seems to be 3 cubic foot bags of garden soil by Kellogg any opinions?should I mix in compost..how much?should i add any sand?worms?anything else?I am new to this and want to do it right.Thanks for your help. If rock gardening is not your cup of tea, you might consider the xeriscape as a practical alternative to more traditional yard designs. Although xeriscaping is associated with drought-plagued areas, don’t underestimate the benefits it can bring to yards far-removed from the desert. You can save yourself time and money by planting low-maintenance, drought-tolerant perennials, in addition to grouping plants with similar irrigation needs together in your yard. We moved into our current house two years ago, it’s twelve years old, north facing rear garden. The lawn area (and most of the garden to be honest is a mess), we got a lot standing water when it rains, and the grass squelches when walked on. The area closest to the house is the worst. The cause was of course builders rubble, clay and clay subsoil which is just below the turf (which is a shockingly poor turf). Books are great sources of gardening information! We love to help gardeners here at Gardening Know How, we are a great source of information and love to help with all your garden questions! https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/weeds/conventional-weed-killers.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/weed-it-and-reap-how-to-make-your-garden-more-appealing-without-chemicals.htm I drew a picture of a garden and a sidewalk being built around the outside. The height of the inside (garden) was 17 ft and the width was 20 feet. Then, I made a 3-foot corner around all four corners of the garden. So, the height of the exterior was 17 + 3 + 3 = 23 feet, while the width was 3 + 3 + 20 = 26 feet. So, the perimeter of the inside is 74 feet and the perimeter of the outside is 98 feet. I added these two to get 172 feet as the total perimeter. Inexorably, I deemed that 172 feet of lumber was needed for the perimeter of the walk. Is that safe to assume or am I misinterpreting the question/what it is asking for? I am getting a bit « tripped up » of the fact that the problem gave me that, « to make the forms for the cement, we will need to buy some 2-by-4-inch lumber. » I do not know if you would even have a possibly source available near you being in a prairie. However, perhaps look into the Back to Eden style of no till garden. The method uses chipped/shredded wood(tree trimmings) as a mulch and with adding regular compost, which gets distributed down through the chips, it is wonderful(so far at least) and does great things. Remedies: Water more! Set up a small irrigation system to water for you at regular intervals. Add shade cloth to garden beds to help reduce water evaporation. Mix more clay or soil into your garden bed to improve its ability to hold water. Adding mulch may also help plants conserve water. This was an interesting possibility that came up when I started talking with my local gardening neighbor. Animal manures can be high in salts, which can cause issues when compost with high-levels of salt is added to a vegetable garden. However, I ruled out salt in my compost for these reasons: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/weeds/conventional-weed-killers.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/weed-it-and-reap-how-to-make-your-garden-more-appealing-without-chemicals.htm We were determined to get to the bottom of this mystery. I began my research by visiting many different extension agency websites, college horticulture department websites, and other gardening blogs. And I found several potential causes for our misshapen root crops. The forking we saw could have been caused by root knot nematodes, or microscopic worms that feed on plant cells and cause major damage, but these tiny insects produce noticeable galls or “knots” on the roots. These articles have some garden design ideas for you. What animal it might be will depend on your location. It is likely not a mole, because of its diet. Voles (similar to mice) dig shallow tunnels that run along the lawn, as moles do; these rodents can be destructive in the garden. Other small rodents, such as mice might be a possibility as well. Chipmunks also dig tunnels, although you might not see the tunnels running along the surface. Gophers leave mounds of dirt at tunnel entrances, but not tunnels along the grass. Large holes could be a woodchuck, but they don’t have shallow tunnels. Rabbits, crows, raccoons, squirrels, coyotes, deer . . . just about any animal that eats fruit as part of its diet will take advantage of a melon. Raccoons like melons (and corn) especially. What animal it is will affect how you protect the fruit. Good luck! testogen Masculin Active mochoman Erozon Max erogran Testo Ultra BioBelt Maxman power up premium Testo Ultra

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