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I’d like an elegant vegetable garden https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/using-salt-to-kill-weeds.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/weeds/what-is-flame-weeding-information-on-flame-weeding-in-gardens.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/weeds/conventional-weed-killers.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/weed-it-and-reap-how-to-make-your-garden-more-appealing-without-chemicals.htm My biggest problem with my garden is trees! We have a shelterbelt around our whole acreage that includes several rows of trees which are beautiful but we get no sun! I am turning 70 in a few months and Hubs is 74. So it may be that we are more susceptible than you younger gardeners. But it turns out oak leaves harbor mites, and we have been bitten by them. I had a terrible time with what I thought was chiggers in the garden, worse than I could remember since we started gardening here in 2011. And now I have a rash on my leg I cannot get to go away. I’ve been researching and I think that one of two things have happened: 1) I am being bitten by oak mites and not chiggers, and they are triggering an allergy of some kind; and/or 2) I have gotten fungus on my hands from the wood chip pile, and then scratched my chigger (or mite, whichever) bites, thus allowing the fungus to get into my skin. Hubs has had a rash on one of his legs for about six months. We’ve shown our rashes to doctors and they say, “contact dermatitis”. Though the ointments they prescribe do not help. Hubs had an additional problem in that he was shoveling wood chips from the pile and got in a cloud of “dust” which must’ve been fungal in nature. All night that night, he hacked and coughed. Fortunately, those symptoms were gone by morning, and he has since had a chest xray as the normal part of a checkup and everything was ok. But it was kind of scary. We’ll be going back to the doctor and telling them what we think might be causing our rashes now, since doctors these days won’t waste their time doing any detective work and it’s just all too easy to lump every skin problem into “contact dermatitis” and send the patient away. The only problem is, we have to wait almost a month to get in to see the doctor. Sheesh. So much can happen in a month. So I’m trying to think about what I might try in the meantime. Maybe tea tree oil, neat? Sometimes there will be problems in the vegetable garden. There is always a cause and there is often a cure or control. Good question– we have had slightly less rain this year– but I’ve watered sufficiently. And we’ve had other dry years where the garden still thrived, so it’s hard to say for sure. “(A major step is) developing a master plan that you can follow all at once or slowly as you can afford to tackle all parts of your yard,” she added. “This is so important so the look is cohesive, and you don’t have to go back and rip up a vegetable garden when you realize that was the spot for your terrace.” As much as it pains me to say this, I would NOT use any more hay on your garden until you can absolutely, 100% verify the hay or field it came from has not been sprayed with any sort of herbicide. My garden plants are not growing well, just not growing taller or developing well. Some tomatoes blooming, but growth very small. Pepper plants still very small. If I add organic compost or peat moss, should I do this right on top of the existing soil and just lightly turn it around the existing plants, or do I wait until this season is over and just start in the fall? I hate to waste the remainder of the season. THanks for any help! There’s no fighting against nature and plants will adapt to prevailing conditions. James has used native plantings in the garden and likewise, gardening with nature rather than against it gets results. It’s a gardener’s truism that you should always plant according to the conditions particular to your situation. Plant acid-loving plants in acid soils. If they need full sun, choose a sunny spot and if they need lots of water, forget gritty, parched soil. It needn’t be harder than that to start a garden off on a healthy footing. In a Winters walnut orchard, Glassman designed a resort-like pool and patio combination. The mosaics of a Land Park artist became part of her garden makeover. A boring, tired, lawn-heavy Davis landscape transformed into an inspirational zen garden. I, too, know your pain and despair. We live on the western edge of Wyoming at 6000′. Our sons raise cattle, so left-over hay and manure from the cows and horses was easy to obtain. About mid way through the 2014 gardening season, after mulching my peas they just stopped. Hmm, must have been the heat. The beans were just a fair crop that year. 2015, no potatoes, no beans, no peas. They all came up beautifully, but when they started to put out roots – they became stunted, yellowed, twisted, and eventually died. The corn wasn’t bothered. Nor the pumpkin. I thought slugs, virus, disease, too much water. By the end of 2015, research was pointing to contamination. This year, began the same way. Transplants were healthy until put into the garden. Seeds germinate then look awful. After much research – I stopped using the manure tea (it seemed to be the worst culprit – maybe because it is concentrated). Planted all the radish seed I had. The ones I didn’t pick are the size of large potatoes and up to 4′ tall. Started more brassica transplants and planted them all over the garden. Interestingly, where I planted radishes or brassicas next to the peas, the peas actually produced a few peas and did not die immediately. Also, putting fermented molasses water on the potatoes seemed to help a little. We are now looking at cover crops as a way to help remediate. And all the wood stove ash will be dumped in the garden this winter. If you have any questions about any of the services we offer OR just want some gardening advice then please feel free to get in touch. Pollinate with brush, or by shaking plant so that pollen will fall to female flowers (depending on kind). Attract pollinators to garden. Do not kill pollinating insects. How do cutting gardens work? Check for grubs curled in soil at base of plants. Keep garden clean of debris and plant residue. Keep garden weed-free. Use cardboard collars around seedlings. Kendra Wilson trained as a gardener at Cottesbrooke Hall in Northamptonshire, before joining Gardenista when it launched five years ago. Besides The Problem with My Garden, she has co-written The Book of the Dog for Laurence King, as well as The Book of the Bird. Before moving to the country, she lived in central London and was a designer and picture editor, starting at Vogue and ending at the Observer. Winter doesn’t mean you can’t have a garden. It just means you’ll need to do a little extra work. Office hours: 9-5:30pm Mon-Fri; 9-4pm Sat; Closed Sun (but if the weather is really lovely – we’re probably all out in the sunshine gardening, so please leave a message). I use woodchips too, Paul Gautschi gardening method, but I experienced much of what Jill and others have (so thank you Jill for blogging your experience). In retrospect, I need to add more chips during the year like you do, because they do compost during winter-spring so that by summer, there’s no longer at least 4″ of chips, such that the soil below got very dry still especially during our prolonged hot spell in PA. The very bad news is the chemtrails above in our skies, containing metals like aluminum which stunts plant growth. The metals rain down and pollute. Now Paul thinks the chips filter out pollutants, so I may add much more than 4″ next year. Still, the soil takes time to build up healthiness with this method. VigRX erogan Tonus Fortis power up premium Maxman VigRX vigrx Eron Plus VigRX Plus Testogen

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