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I keep reading everyone’s posts because I thought I was the only one with strange results. I also am interested in hearing about other woodchippers. I have the following comments to add: 1. I’ve been a woodchipper (Paul Gautschi, Back to Eden) for three years now and every year the soil gets better as the plants reveal…but one has to be patient with the process, like investing over the years before payoff. Once payoff happens (the right balance of soil chemistry with microorganisms), less work and more productivity is expected. So fertilize your plants to compensate before that magic year which I will be doing in my fourth year. 2. I didn’t plant my tomatoes deeply enough below the 4″ woodchip layer — my mistake — and my results were very disappointing with curly leaves, too much die off. I put new plants in at the beginning of August at a deep level, and they’re doing well, except yellowing at bottom…we haven’t had much rain here. 3. my potatoes are doing excellent — buried deep below the chips. 4. Chips are challenging with root crops while the soil is still building, so I’m doing a garden bed without chips next year and for several years more. 5. there is definitely a larger picture in which the pollution of our skies and water is a factor, which makes me want to stick with chips for greater protection, though our productivity may still be affected. The pollution dries out the soil and hurts plant growth. 6, yes I think one has to do their best to avoid chips which were herbicide-treated before cut down. 7. I would like to get chickens to help with the gardening tilling and fertilizing. Good luck, hope Brian helps protect your back garden so you can continue enjoying the birdlife . Healthy growth is the mainstay of every garden. Why design something that looks great on the drawing board but fails to provide the right environment for plants to thrive? You end up wasting time, money, energy and possibly even harming your garden environment. 5. What gardening dilemma are you facing at the moment in your garden? My own garden has at least a dozen dilemmas, mainly to do with living in a cottage. The neighbors are very close but once you walk down toward the field that we back on to (where lambs are hopping about right now), then it is completely private. Though rather far from the house. Since writing the book I am changing my garden completely, after 12 years of indecision. I now have the confidence, and trust my ideas. But the Magic Garden, as it’s affectionately called, may not be in bloom for much longer. Stewart said an official with the post office told her last week the garden has to go. A USPS spokeswoman confirmed to 41 Action News there are concerns about overgrowth, adding the appearance is « not favorable. » Jill, I’ve used the deep mulch method now for two seasons. A local tree company brings truckloads of wood chips to me free of charge whenever I need them. They are happy to have a place to dump the clippings so it’s a win-win. Of course there is no knowing what’s been sprayed on the trees (hopefully not any since it’s mainly trimmings from roadside power lines) but at least I know it’s not broad leaf herbicide that’s being consumed by grazing animals. The diversity of organic matter is also very beneficial to the soil and over time supports perennial vegetables, fruit and nut trees. It’s true there is a huge benefit to deep mulch gardening with the decrease in watering and weeding. There are other issues that I’m figuring out as I go along but so far so good and I plan to continue with this method. I, too, know your pain and despair. We live on the western edge of Wyoming at 6000′. Our sons raise cattle, so left-over hay and manure from the cows and horses was easy to obtain. About mid way through the 2014 gardening season, after mulching my peas they just stopped. Hmm, must have been the heat. The beans were just a fair crop that year. 2015, no potatoes, no beans, no peas. They all came up beautifully, but when they started to put out roots – they became stunted, yellowed, twisted, and eventually died. The corn wasn’t bothered. Nor the pumpkin. I thought slugs, virus, disease, too much water. By the end of 2015, research was pointing to contamination. This year, began the same way. Transplants were healthy until put into the garden. Seeds germinate then look awful. After much research – I stopped using the manure tea (it seemed to be the worst culprit – maybe because it is concentrated). Planted all the radish seed I had. The ones I didn’t pick are the size of large potatoes and up to 4′ tall. Started more brassica transplants and planted them all over the garden. Interestingly, where I planted radishes or brassicas next to the peas, the peas actually produced a few peas and did not die immediately. Also, putting fermented molasses water on the potatoes seemed to help a little. We are now looking at cover crops as a way to help remediate. And all the wood stove ash will be dumped in the garden this winter. Helping you find solutions to common insect pests, diseases and weeds in your garden. The most important benefit of fungi, however, is their capacity to create crumb structure in your soil. This is the most desirable characteristic for garden soils. A soil with crumb structure can breathe freely while allowing ease of root growth and ideal water infiltration. Earthworms move unimpeded through these aggregates, as do beneficial nematodes and microarthropods. You can plunge your hands deep into this medium and it smells good enough to eat. Gardening is pure pleasure when you have achieved this holy grail of good soil management, but it is not possible without nurturing your fungal workforce. Life Force® Instant Humus™ involves super-concentrated soluble humic acid granules. Two teaspoons of these black crystals are added to a watering can full of water, and applied to 10 m2 of soil. You will almost hear your fungi rejoice! If there are problems you need solutions too, we’ve got answers to lots of them. There’s help with what plants to use or even if what’s around the garden is causing a problem – we’ve advice on what to do there too!. Good luck, hope Brian helps protect your back garden so you can continue enjoying the birdlife . Grow disease-resistant varieties. Keep garden weed free and clean. Pests and problems come up in any garden setting. To have the best garden you can have you must go on the offensive to treat garden pest problems in your landscape. Find tips to peacefully coexist with dogs, pests, and prevent any of your garden problems! My sympathies! I had similiar problems in 2008. At that time there was little information about persistent herbicides. After 30 years of careful organic gardening, I almost gave up gardening. Fortunately, my whole garden wasn’t involved! I no longer use manure. For the last 3 years I have used barley straw from a nearby farmer who doesn’t use persistent herbicides. Yes, barley comes up but it is easy to pull. Failing that, we can help you create the garden you’d love to – and we only need some photo’s! Dudeni, if it’s thick clay and north facing, I’d consider going grass less. You’ll never get a good lawn with those conditions. You’ll be permanently fighting moss and bad drainage. Your problem isn’t easily rectified and lack of sun is something you can’t solve. I’d seriously consider a different style of garden. Container gardening New garden owners panic sometimes panic about things they’ve heard; received wisdom can be quite detrimental. Wisteria, for instance, has a reputation for being difficult. A brief explanation that I received while training at Cottesbrooke Hall has always stuck; in its logic, it is not difficult at all. The same goes for roses, which I also talk about. More is to be gained from doing, than reading, and the friendly tone of my book will hopefully get people to open the back door, secateurs in hand. deseo eracto eracto Testogen eracto Zevs Maxman machoman Zevs Testo Ultra

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