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You might appreciate a post I wrote earlier this year on the herbicide problem with straw bale gardening: http://www.thesurvivalgardener.com/danger-of-straw-bale-gardening-no-one-is-mentioning/ How about adding VOLES to the list of garden Pests. I have one that has eaten everyone of my marigolds and chwews off one whole patch of Bee Balm. Now the beast is eating my tomatoes to get all of the seeds. Yes it is a vole because I have seen him or them scurrying in an around my planting beds. I have put out three live catch traps and all have remained empty. I put out glue boards up next to the foundation of the house and he kicked dirt all over them. I put out poison and it hasn’t been touched in two weeks. These thinks are the bane of my summer gardening. Straw and manure are both completely unsafe now and I recommended in my composting book that gardeners now need to stay away from both except under very narrow restrictions, such as they grew it themselves or got manure from an animal that has not been fed any hay from outside sources. Really frustrating. What would you suggest to deter monkeys from raiding the garden? Through its county agents, the Cooperative Extension Service gives individuals access to the resources at land-grant universities across the nation. These universities are centers for research in many subjects, including entomology (the study of insects) and agriculture. Each county within the United States has an Extension office, which is staffed with agents who work closely with university-based Extension specialists to deliver answers to your questions about gardening, agriculture, and pest control. You can find the phone number for your local county extension office in the local government section (often marked with blue pages) of your telephone directory or by clicking on the map below. I have a lack of time for upkeep and need a garden that will be somewhat self-sufficient. I bought a new build house which was built on land previously probably thought unsuitable due to being damp and low lying, it had been a garden nursery. The garden didn’t drain, however the builders are only responsible for an area 1m ( I think it was) from the house walls. The builders also said that drainage will improve over time once land has settled. I’m not sure how it has panned out as the house was sold on. Very annoying. Prob not much you can do without spending money. I have a vegetable garden as well s many flowers. Last week as I was weeding, I found a huge jelly like substance around one of my celery plants. I dug this out and thought everything was okay. Today I noticed in a windowbox with flowers, the same jelly like substance around each flower and a bunch of flies all over the plants. What is this? And more importantly, how do I get rid of it? I have had a similar problem in my garden. I started a small area as a deep mulch bed, and NOTHING would sprout. Thinking that it was the chickens (they have only this year been let into the garden to free rang and have been eating any sprouts they can get there beaks on), I started some seeds and transplanted them. They grew for a few days, then just died. It was very strange. I hope its not this! The next phase of the lesson encouraged exploring different size gardens – first 6 plants … then 10 … then 20. Lots of work with materials and lots of recording. Some children gave up modelling and began drawing, especially when the number of plants got bigger. When a problem is seen as insurmountable, it can stop people from doing anything, especially when added to worries about keeping plants alive. I’ve avoided being too technical and have emphasised an approach which is not time-consuming, or complicated. This is the kind of gardening that appeals to me. I use blackcat firecrackers to scare off strays, possums, etc. Maybe they will work for deer also? Also, I mulched my garden 2 years ago and everything died. I was told mulching robbed it of it’s nitrogen. This year I shoveled in a truckload of mushroom compost and it is still not doing well. I suppose next I’ll have to plant a bunch of clover to restore the nitrogen. Remedies: Water more! Set up a small irrigation system to water for you at regular intervals. Add shade cloth to garden beds to help reduce water evaporation. Mix more clay or soil into your garden bed to improve its ability to hold water. Adding mulch may also help plants conserve water. Well Doctor, we’ve always said that part of the fun of gardening, is learning new things. The first step is to diagnose plant problems. Put on your investigator’s cap, examine the symptoms, identify the causes, administer the cure (most are quite simple), and learn some new « stuff ». My garden is on a steep slope In Sam and Jill’s garden there are two sorts of ladybirds. There are red Seven-Spot ladybirds with $7$ black spots and shiny black Four-Spot ladybirds with $4$ red spots. We have loads of tips and garden advice so you can find a solution to most common garden problems alongside practical solutions for sorting them out. Perhaps your problem isn’t prying eyes, but voracious appetites. There’s a whole litany of garden pests that can make short work of your plants and of all the work you’ve put into growing them. Fortunately, you’re not helpless against your plant-devouring foes. In the resources that I provide on pest control, I try to give you as many choices as possible. Don’t like to use poisons? No problem: I offer organic landscaping solutions, too. Don’t want to remove the pests entirely from your property, preferring instead merely to fence them out? Again, no problem. Just browse my pest control resources on groundhogs, rabbits, voles, and deer, and you’re bound to find a landscaping solution that suits your needs and tastes. New garden owners panic sometimes panic about things they’ve heard; received wisdom can be quite detrimental. Wisteria, for instance, has a reputation for being difficult. A brief explanation that I received while training at Cottesbrooke Hall has always stuck; in its logic, it is not difficult at all. The same goes for roses, which I also talk about. More is to be gained from doing, than reading, and the friendly tone of my book will hopefully get people to open the back door, secateurs in hand. Don’t let weeds rob your garden of its beauty. Use our guide to help you… Jill, you CAN absolutely use cattle manure and straw for compost. My parents did it every year between the rows of their garden on their farm where potatoes strawberries and tomatoes thrived in rural Pennsylvania. I’m assuming you buy your hay, I haven’t read much further yet, but if you buy hay for your animals just ask for Timothy hay or Kentucky Blue Grass from the local farmers. Also there is such a thing as a laboratory to send a soil sample to check with your county or state extension office as well as local universities, Penn State does soil samples but that might be awhile for you to ship soil. Both my parents and my husband sent theirs off. The key is always the acidity balance. Also Jill I am telling you MUSHROOM SOIL in a raised bed to start. My husband used this soil in a raised bed when he lived in the city and his plants were GORGEOUS. Then next year till that soil into your soil. I hope this helps!!! My garden has been a « fail » the last couple of years…not sure what’s wrong….fertilizer, too wet, bad soil, ???? VigRX Plus mochoman VigRX eracto BioBelt Testogen deseo Testogen Testogen VigRX Plus

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