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Helenah Girgis has a bumper crop in her garden this summer. Helping you find solutions to common insect pests, diseases and weeds in your garden. You wouldn’t want Roundup Ready alfalfa anyway if your trying to have a clean healthy garden. I remember reading somewhere that Roundup was found in lettuce sample a year after it was sprayed on a field. There may not be enough to harm the plants but why take the risk? Hi, sounds like sparrowhawk and not local cats to blame then! I was upset thinking the cat had got it for no other reason than to play with it as they certainly aren’t hungry(unless they are feral cats) as you say its nature and sparrowhawk has to eat. i find it hard with cats as its not for food, its just for fun, know that’s how cats are and don’t like them because of it! They wreak havoc on the natural wildlife and poo in your garden to boot! 🙂 « The $10 billion-a-year U.S. horticulture industry is based on cheap oil and cheap plastics, » writes Beth Botts in the Chicago Tribune. Botts has won awards for her eloquent writing on the problems of garden plastics. Chief among them is the lack of standards for materials, colors or sizes of pots and other garden plastics. Often the materials used are not even identified — making them devilishly hard to recycle. And the industry shies away from reuse because of the risks of spreading plant disease. Expert tips on how to design a small garden plus three gorgeous garden layouts for you to try Helenah Girgis has a bumper crop in her garden this summer. Report that your garden waste was not collected, or that your bin is damaged or missing. Sign up to receive our eco newsletter full of great organic gardening tips plus product updates and offers. The key to your small-space urban gardening success has a lot to do with the types of pots or planters you select. 300px wide Use our guide to prevent and control weeds in your garden. I have had very good luck with my compost and mulch(alfalfa rotted hay). I started out building my beds by sheet mulching the area. Cardboard, Agricultural molasses, compost, more molasses based fertilizer with mushroom extracts, more compost and then a heavy layer of rotted hay. Five seasons in, Now i use a cover crop and chop and drop all season. clover is great at fixing nitrogen and i find it in areas the soil needs repair, it goes away as the soil enriches. You might consider putting down a good molasses based fertilizer( i get mine in bulk 55 gal drums) and planting in a cover crop to your damaged areas Let that brew all winter and see if it helps. I am finding minerals are huge in soil health. My climate and soil is similar to yours, we are high prairie desert with wind and heat extremes. I have been fortunate to have a very robust garden this season with minimal to almost no watering. Related: find out how to deter cats from your garden. We collect missed garden waste collections once a week on a scheduled day. Please let us know using the form below within two working days if you have had any issues with your collection. You will need your subscription number to complete the form. I had an experience this year with my mulch garden. I used a sprinkler with our well water (artesian water with high pH) and watered during a hot day (95+) temps. We usually use a soaker hose or rainwater, but tried the sprinkler this year. It totally burned the tomato, potato, and melon leaves. The rest of the garden didn’t look that great either. Another lesson learned after over 30 years of gardening. Because scientific facts tell us it’s not a problem. I’m sorry but whatever you read is false — this isn’t a mechanism to allow glyphosate to bioaccumulate like that. Its soil half life is less than 100 days. It has never been found to accumulate in plants. It’s not possible for lettuce to carry the residue because it would in fact damage and/or kill the plant – lettuce isn’t resistant. There are zero reasons to be concerned with RR alfalfa hay in your garden. “We’ve been wanting to do a book together for awhile,” said Glassman, who also credited Ballinger with making the book about more than California gardening. Lettuce and hostas are popular food for slugs, which can nibble garden plants to pieces. My lawn guy was giving me grass clippings from my yard as well as the neighbors – but I stopped doing that because I think the neighbor had their yard sprayed with a weed killer of some kind and it got into my compost. I think my garden that season was poisoned by the compost. Now I just use clippings from my own yard because I know they’re not sprayed with anything. Several years ago, i had a problem with something eating strawberries in my garden. I put out glue boards (2) to catch whatever it was, and caught 2 cardinals, both of which were killed by the glue boards. Not a pretty site….and i was devastated. I will never use glue boards again….and am always sure to plant enough for everyone/everything….. Large front gardens: what’s the point? My wife’s family grows alfalfa and I have been using hay from their barn floors for the last few years to deep mulch my garden. Been loving it and my garden grows great……….however…..I have been worried about this issue as they recently planted a field of “Round Up Ready Alfalfa.” You can no longer assume that alfalfa isn’t sprayed with herbicides. They have been using grass killers in alfalfa fields for years. Most garden plants aren’t grasses so maybe that’s why it’s been a bit of a non issue……but the effect of round up residues may potentially bring about different concerns. Thanks for sharing Jill. I’ll be keeping a close eye on things as I have been hoping this wouldn’t be an issue. We were determined to get to the bottom of this mystery. I began my research by visiting many different extension agency websites, college horticulture department websites, and other gardening blogs. And I found several potential causes for our misshapen root crops. The forking we saw could have been caused by root knot nematodes, or microscopic worms that feed on plant cells and cause major damage, but these tiny insects produce noticeable galls or “knots” on the roots. But not to worry. With photos and simple tips, she says, each chapter “is a garden tour…sharing the surprisingly simple ideas that can solve complex dilemmas.” And we’re off: There’s no fighting against nature and plants will adapt to prevailing conditions. James has used native plantings in the garden and likewise, gardening with nature rather than against it gets results. It’s a gardener’s truism that you should always plant according to the conditions particular to your situation. Plant acid-loving plants in acid soils. If they need full sun, choose a sunny spot and if they need lots of water, forget gritty, parched soil. It needn’t be harder than that to start a garden off on a healthy footing. I, too, know your pain and despair. We live on the western edge of Wyoming at 6000′. Our sons raise cattle, so left-over hay and manure from the cows and horses was easy to obtain. About mid way through the 2014 gardening season, after mulching my peas they just stopped. Hmm, must have been the heat. The beans were just a fair crop that year. 2015, no potatoes, no beans, no peas. They all came up beautifully, but when they started to put out roots – they became stunted, yellowed, twisted, and eventually died. The corn wasn’t bothered. Nor the pumpkin. I thought slugs, virus, disease, too much water. By the end of 2015, research was pointing to contamination. This year, began the same way. Transplants were healthy until put into the garden. Seeds germinate then look awful. After much research – I stopped using the manure tea (it seemed to be the worst culprit – maybe because it is concentrated). Planted all the radish seed I had. The ones I didn’t pick are the size of large potatoes and up to 4′ tall. Started more brassica transplants and planted them all over the garden. Interestingly, where I planted radishes or brassicas next to the peas, the peas actually produced a few peas and did not die immediately. Also, putting fermented molasses water on the potatoes seemed to help a little. We are now looking at cover crops as a way to help remediate. And all the wood stove ash will be dumped in the garden this winter. Maxman Maxman VigRX Plus eracto Eron Plus TestX Core Maca du Pérou Zevs TestX Core Celuraid Muscle

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