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Weeds are tough competitors in a garden. Learn about killing weeds before… This week our columnist Lydia Harvey shows us how easy it is to start a garden – even when you don’t have a lot of space. Mexican Feather Grass does lie down. If you don’t like this affect, you can give it a haircut with a few inches of the top to prevent flopping. It probably looks best if cut once or twice during the season. Also, be sure to pull out dead foliage new foliage emerges. However, if everything is pulling out easily, then the plant didn’t root well. Provide a well-drained soil (not too compact) and water regularly during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Reduce watering after establishment. In terms of the sage, we haven’t heard of mole problems. Moles tend to eat grubs in lawns. Voles, however, love spring perennials. If you are concerned, we’d suggest raised garden beds or dig a trench around the area that you want protected. My heirloom tomatoes looked just like this in my garden this year! Unfortunately, I agree with your “detective work” and conclusions. I don’t know if the source of the toxicity was from my mulch, straw/hay mulch, or drift from surrounding farm crop fields. My overall garden was pretty much a failure this year, despite good weather conditions, multiple plantings, and good care. I’m obviously going to have to do something different next year…not sure what! Thanks for sharing your experiences, please keep us posted! The calendar says it is January, but gardening enthusiasts have already begun planning for spring.  Seeds are being ordered, grow lights are being tested and garden centers will have a run on grow pots. Every gardener wants to improve upon last year’s results. Many will try to new strategies to protect against the pest that drove them crazy the previous year.  A big pest is the deer that come to browse in your yard. These beautiful creatures have now become a nuisance and your hard work and planning will have been in vain! If you are suspicious, but have not actually seen the deer snacking, footprints and droppings are a sure sign that they have been in your yard.  Also, typical signs of deer damage are plants with ripped or jagged edges leaves and tree bark with score marks.   An adult deer eats 6-10 pounds of greenery per day so you will need a definite plan to keep the deer out of the garden.  A fence is a sure way to keep them out, but costly and may take away from the natural beauty of your property.  Deer resistant plants can be planted around the plants that the deer are targeting. For example: plants with furred leaves or spines and that have a strong smell will be less appealing to them. Surround your garden with herbs with a strong scent which will mask the aroma of your annuals. Repellents are another way to deter deer. Because deer have such a keen sense of smell repellents can be very effective.  Just as the wonderful smell of your flower garden attracts, repellents can do the opposite with odoriferous ingredients.  Bobbex Deer Repellent is proven the most effective on the market and can be used year-round to protect against the deer.  So while you are planning your garden, plan on all natural, environmentally friendly Bobbex Deer and Animal Repellents. Garden conditions – waterlogging, coastal gardening Don’t forget mole crickets. Very destructive to gardens and a real problem in Florida..even the pythons won’t touch them (lol). Hello, I have watched a video called “Back to Eden”, and thought you might be interested in it as a new way to mulch your garden. I am soon going to implement this new way of gardening. I found this video on Mercola.com. This video is a no till approach and keeps all living organisms in the soil. So you will have healthier plants. Why does an industry that should be green have such a horrible track record when it comes to plastic, and what’s a home gardener to do? My garden is a car park Other ideas for avoiding or minimizing plastic in the garden? Please share! Hi everyone, I have been feeding the birds in my garden for sometime, i don’t have a great variety of birds, mostly blackbird & sparrows but its nice to see them feeding. However, it looks like someone near by,( i don’t know who), has acquired a couple of cats  and i have seen them in my garden. I have a greyhound and I am sure that if the cats get chased by him they won’t be back in a hurry however my dog does not go in front garden as it is not secure. yesterday my worst fears were confirmed when I came in and found feathers and remains of a bird in the front garden > I am so upset, and I don’t know whether to carry on putting food out now. I have to say I am not a big fan of cats because of the sheer amount of harm they do to wildlife, a lot of problems could be solved by people keeping them in from dawn till dusk which is when they kill the most birds. From past experience things to deter cats never seem to work, but if anyone has any ideas i would be pleased to hear them 🙂 I am turning 70 in a few months and Hubs is 74. So it may be that we are more susceptible than you younger gardeners. But it turns out oak leaves harbor mites, and we have been bitten by them. I had a terrible time with what I thought was chiggers in the garden, worse than I could remember since we started gardening here in 2011. And now I have a rash on my leg I cannot get to go away. I’ve been researching and I think that one of two things have happened: 1) I am being bitten by oak mites and not chiggers, and they are triggering an allergy of some kind; and/or 2) I have gotten fungus on my hands from the wood chip pile, and then scratched my chigger (or mite, whichever) bites, thus allowing the fungus to get into my skin. Hubs has had a rash on one of his legs for about six months. We’ve shown our rashes to doctors and they say, “contact dermatitis”. Though the ointments they prescribe do not help. Hubs had an additional problem in that he was shoveling wood chips from the pile and got in a cloud of “dust” which must’ve been fungal in nature. All night that night, he hacked and coughed. Fortunately, those symptoms were gone by morning, and he has since had a chest xray as the normal part of a checkup and everything was ok. But it was kind of scary. We’ll be going back to the doctor and telling them what we think might be causing our rashes now, since doctors these days won’t waste their time doing any detective work and it’s just all too easy to lump every skin problem into “contact dermatitis” and send the patient away. The only problem is, we have to wait almost a month to get in to see the doctor. Sheesh. So much can happen in a month. So I’m trying to think about what I might try in the meantime. Maybe tea tree oil, neat? Hello am66,     Is there any way you can find a space in your back garden for the feeders, I assume that is fenced off for your greyhound as he would be a good deterrent to the cats.  I’m sorry you found feathers and remains of a bird but it is possible a Sparrowhawk could have predated the bird and not a cat as I think cats tend to take their prey away/ home and in tact.     There is an ultrasonic device that seems to get good reviews on Amazon website  HERE   and I know a fellow member on here (  Monkeycheese ) has just purchased two of them so maybe when he has had chance to test them out he can advise you how well they work.    Good luck, hope the cats get the message to stay out of your garden so you can continue to enjoy the visiting birds.    sterydy Testogen Eron Plus TestX Core power up premium Anabolic Rx24 VigRX TestX Core Zevs Peruanisches Maca

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