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As much as it pains me to say this, I would NOT use any more hay on your garden until you can absolutely, 100% verify the hay or field it came from has not been sprayed with any sort of herbicide. Where: Browsers are found nibbling on gardens, tender perennials and young trees. Rock the pots You’ve successfully kept a small pot of herbs alive and feel like you can expand out. To do this, buy a large garden pot and fill it with soil, add seedlings and water regularly. This works well for silverbeet, strawberries even tomatoes and chillies. Also check out miniature fruit trees which thrive in pots. Mahmod, Janet Woody, our librarian who runs our Horticulture Helpline here at Lewis Ginter, has written a response for you with some suggestions for how to get your container garden started. Here’s a link: http://www.lewisginter.org/blog/2013/01/04/raised-planter-gardening/ Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thanks, Jonah You might appreciate a post I wrote earlier this year on the herbicide problem with straw bale gardening: http://www.thesurvivalgardener.com/danger-of-straw-bale-gardening-no-one-is-mentioning/ Vegetable Gardening for Beginners! Your complete guide on how to grow a vegetable garden—from scratch! Yes, I’ve heard a lot of people complaining about strange gardens this year. I don’t know what to think… Help solve your gardening problem. Here are the answers to some commonly asked gardening questions with hints, tips and advice on getting the best results from your garden. The definitive guide to stylish outdoor spaces, with garden tours, hardscape help, plant primers, and daily design news. My garden plants are not growing well, just not growing taller or developing well. Some tomatoes blooming, but growth very small. Pepper plants still very small. If I add organic compost or peat moss, should I do this right on top of the existing soil and just lightly turn it around the existing plants, or do I wait until this season is over and just start in the fall? I hate to waste the remainder of the season. THanks for any help! Good question– we have had slightly less rain this year– but I’ve watered sufficiently. And we’ve had other dry years where the garden still thrived, so it’s hard to say for sure. Just had similar experience this year. Moved far, far away, bought a farm in a climate where people actually grow crops…not just grass hay. Inquired about the “free” compost pile at landfill then got schooled by local gardeners that some farmers spray “Grazon” (had NEVER heard of it!) and the likes and to be very wary about buying topsoil/compost from local sources. Was so excited to find big round bales of straw on my place left from past owner. Built amazing lasagne style gardens with this straw and also mulched top of most beds with it. Found out it was sprayed and did my best to get the mulch off but the lasagne beds were hopeless. Wow. I lost almost everything that had been planted in those beds and that was the only variable that was different. Want seclusion? Then this is the garden for you. All walls/fences have trellis panels fixed to their fronts and tops so that climbers can be trained up to hide the space from onlookers. The wide S-shaped path is cobbled for a relaxed feel, so make sure you choose a table and chairs with chunky legs to avoid wobble. Go for low-maintenance exotics, which provide year-round interest, and place large plants, such as tree ferns and a windmill palm, in the borders, so that the shed can’t be seen from indoors and the bench is hidden from neighbouring houses. Passionflowers grow quickly, but won’t damage fences or brickwork if given supports, such as a trellis, to cling to. Solution: Don’t fight the rocks; design a rock garden. Rocks add visual appeal and function to anchor the soil. Plant rock crevices with drought-tolerant plants such as ice plant and sedum as a form of xeriscaping. Through its county agents, the Cooperative Extension Service gives individuals access to the resources at land-grant universities across the nation. These universities are centers for research in many subjects, including entomology (the study of insects) and agriculture. Each county within the United States has an Extension office, which is staffed with agents who work closely with university-based Extension specialists to deliver answers to your questions about gardening, agriculture, and pest control. You can find the phone number for your local county extension office in the local government section (often marked with blue pages) of your telephone directory or by clicking on the map below. But not to worry. With photos and simple tips, she says, each chapter “is a garden tour…sharing the surprisingly simple ideas that can solve complex dilemmas.” And we’re off: This is not an expensive garden to create, but you can cut down on planting by making the central grassed area larger, or by stretching it into an oval to fill more of the borders. We asked garden designer Katrina Wells of Earth Designs to come up with three different designs. Our tip is to choose light-reflecting colours and add details you’d find indoors, such as mirrors, to increase the sense of space. As for budget, we’ve suggested where you can make savings. All you have to do is choose the right plan for you. Lettuce and hostas are popular food for slugs, which can nibble garden plants to pieces. Mahmod, Janet Woody, our librarian who runs our Horticulture Helpline here at Lewis Ginter, has written a response for you with some suggestions for how to get your container garden started. Here’s a link: http://www.lewisginter.org/blog/2013/01/04/raised-planter-gardening/ Please let me know if you have any additional questions. Thanks, Jonah I am sooo grateful for this post! I have had “bad luck” with my tomatos for the past 3 to 4 years, and I could not for the life of me figure out what I was doing wrong! Now I see that I had done the same as you had, adding manure (from my neighbors aged cow manure pile) to our garden. I used to grow beautiful tomatos, and beamed with pride at my quarts of lovely canned tomatos lined up on my shelf, waiting to be enjoyed in the midst of winter! I guess pride came before the fall! LOL! I have tried everything I could think of to try to deal with the problem, even moving all my tomatos to big pots on my porch, BUT I was still using soil from my garden! AhHa! My mom had a bumper crop of tomatos this year, using big pots on her porch, but the only soil she used was Miracle Gro Moisture Control soil, and I am going to do this next year! I don’t like having to buy soil when we have access to all the free manure to amend our soil, but, in light of this info, I think that we may have to, at least for our tomato plants. I have not noticed any of my other plants having the problems like the tomatos, so at least my garden will not be totally unusable next summer. Thank you so much for all the info!!! 🙂 Blessings, and Happy Fall! 🙂 As we gardeners say “NEXT year things will be better!” https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/vines/clematis/clematis-with-yellow-leaves.htm These links will help you with some shade gardening ideas. Start small From windowsill herb planters, garden towers and even hanging baskets – these are ideal for an apartment window or a mini-balcony. It’s also the perfect place to start if you have limited outdoor space. Just joined but looking for some advice please on the garden which has dying grass – yellow, dead and some green. So: you either 1) love moles enough to leave them alone, in which case they’ll constantly dig up your yard/ruin your garden, or 2) you like your lawn/garden without mole tunnels and mounds MORE than you love moles, which means getting rid of the moles by either trapping/re-homing them (which, as I said, will kill them 99 times out of 100) or setting kill traps. Celuraid Muscle Celuraid Muscle Masculin Active Testogen Maxman BeMass power up premium Maca du Pérou erogan TestX Core

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