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Hello am66,     Is there any way you can find a space in your back garden for the feeders, I assume that is fenced off for your greyhound as he would be a good deterrent to the cats.  I’m sorry you found feathers and remains of a bird but it is possible a Sparrowhawk could have predated the bird and not a cat as I think cats tend to take their prey away/ home and in tact.     There is an ultrasonic device that seems to get good reviews on Amazon website  HERE   and I know a fellow member on here (  Monkeycheese ) has just purchased two of them so maybe when he has had chance to test them out he can advise you how well they work.    Good luck, hope the cats get the message to stay out of your garden so you can continue to enjoy the visiting birds.    I, too, know your pain and despair. We live on the western edge of Wyoming at 6000′. Our sons raise cattle, so left-over hay and manure from the cows and horses was easy to obtain. About mid way through the 2014 gardening season, after mulching my peas they just stopped. Hmm, must have been the heat. The beans were just a fair crop that year. 2015, no potatoes, no beans, no peas. They all came up beautifully, but when they started to put out roots – they became stunted, yellowed, twisted, and eventually died. The corn wasn’t bothered. Nor the pumpkin. I thought slugs, virus, disease, too much water. By the end of 2015, research was pointing to contamination. This year, began the same way. Transplants were healthy until put into the garden. Seeds germinate then look awful. After much research – I stopped using the manure tea (it seemed to be the worst culprit – maybe because it is concentrated). Planted all the radish seed I had. The ones I didn’t pick are the size of large potatoes and up to 4′ tall. Started more brassica transplants and planted them all over the garden. Interestingly, where I planted radishes or brassicas next to the peas, the peas actually produced a few peas and did not die immediately. Also, putting fermented molasses water on the potatoes seemed to help a little. We are now looking at cover crops as a way to help remediate. And all the wood stove ash will be dumped in the garden this winter. Every garden deserves a citrus tree. In all but the coldest districts, citrus trees feature in backyards. Being in touch with nature improves your health and overall happiness. It is very relaxing to do things in nature and natural experiences can reduce stress and leave us feeling peaceful. There is no better way to get in touch with nature and natural rhythms than growing and caring for your own food. You don’t have to have a garden or even a yard, you can grow beautiful plants on your balcony or even in your living room. Even a few plants will produce a good amount of food for you to eat or share with friends and family. Just had similar experience this year. Moved far, far away, bought a farm in a climate where people actually grow crops…not just grass hay. Inquired about the “free” compost pile at landfill then got schooled by local gardeners that some farmers spray “Grazon” (had NEVER heard of it!) and the likes and to be very wary about buying topsoil/compost from local sources. Was so excited to find big round bales of straw on my place left from past owner. Built amazing lasagne style gardens with this straw and also mulched top of most beds with it. Found out it was sprayed and did my best to get the mulch off but the lasagne beds were hopeless. Wow. I lost almost everything that had been planted in those beds and that was the only variable that was different. The type of drainage used depends largely on the extent of the problem. If the water logging is not severe and there is only excess surface water, it may be possible to overcome the problem by shaping the garden surfaces so that the water flows off into ditches. These ditches should be 0.9-1.2m (3 to 4 ft.) deep, with sloping sides. This can be very frustrating! https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/deer/deer-repellents.htm Laura is the Community Kitchen Garden Horticulturist at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. When she’s not working in vegetable garden, she enjoys spending her days at the river and checking out all of the new restaurants the Richmond food scene has to offer. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/shade/shade-tolerant-flowers.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/testing-soil.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/improving-garden-soil.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/mulch/choosing-garden-mulch.htm Gardening is a beautiful and healthy thing, right? Bright flowers, fresh food, dappled shade from a leafy tree… unfortunately, it also means lots of plastic. The gardening industry consumes hundreds of millions of pounds of plastic each year and, according to Penn State scientist James Garthe, only about 1% of that is recycled – a far lower rate than other industries (about 25% of plastic in milk jugs is recycled, for example). I garden in raised beds in a suburban neighborhood. All six of my tomato plants did this last year. Couldn’t figure out why, since they had come from two different nurseries. Replanted tomatoes in the same spot, but late in the season, and they were fine. This year the tomatoes are going great, but the leaves of the potatoes in a wooden barrel curled in the same way. Few blossoms and zero potatoes. The really scary thing about this is that the only thing I had added to the tomato bed last year was manure from the big box store. And the potato barrel the year had mostly bagged garden soil, again from the big box store. When even the bagged, name brand products are contaminated, we have a very large problem that needs a lot more attention drawn to it. The calendar says it is January, but gardening enthusiasts have already begun planning for spring.  Seeds are being ordered, grow lights are being tested and garden centers will have a run on grow pots. Every gardener wants to improve upon last year’s results. Many will try to new strategies to protect against the pest that drove them crazy the previous year.  A big pest is the deer that come to browse in your yard. These beautiful creatures have now become a nuisance and your hard work and planning will have been in vain! If you are suspicious, but have not actually seen the deer snacking, footprints and droppings are a sure sign that they have been in your yard.  Also, typical signs of deer damage are plants with ripped or jagged edges leaves and tree bark with score marks.   An adult deer eats 6-10 pounds of greenery per day so you will need a definite plan to keep the deer out of the garden.  A fence is a sure way to keep them out, but costly and may take away from the natural beauty of your property.  Deer resistant plants can be planted around the plants that the deer are targeting. For example: plants with furred leaves or spines and that have a strong smell will be less appealing to them. Surround your garden with herbs with a strong scent which will mask the aroma of your annuals. Repellents are another way to deter deer. Because deer have such a keen sense of smell repellents can be very effective.  Just as the wonderful smell of your flower garden attracts, repellents can do the opposite with odoriferous ingredients.  Bobbex Deer Repellent is proven the most effective on the market and can be used year-round to protect against the deer.  So while you are planning your garden, plan on all natural, environmentally friendly Bobbex Deer and Animal Repellents. deseo erozon max Eron Plus Celuraid Muscle Maxman el macho Tonus Fortis Celuraid Muscle erozon max Eron Plus

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