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My son, having not been able to secure work since he left school two-and-a-half years ago, recently started helping a friend doing gardening work part time. He is paid a more or less fixed sum each day, and is no longer signing on. Luba has to choose one of the buckets in order to water the garden as fast as possible (as mentioned above, each hour she will water some continuous subsegment of length ai if she chooses the i-th bucket). Help her to determine the minimum number of hours she has to spend watering the garden. It is guaranteed that Luba can always choose a bucket so it is possible water the garden. tui gardentui pettui at home I think I poisoned my garden. Q. Mike: I’m hoping you can help kick-start a new program at our community garden. Historically, we’ve had one large cold compost heap that was an unmanaged eyesore. The « compost committee » has chosen to move in a new direction and have the individual gardeners create and manage their own composting. Some gardeners are planning to group together and build large 3-bin systems; others just want a small pile for their own 10 x 10 plot. Either way, we’re urging them to learn ‘hot composting’ techniques, as I know that compost that heats up quickly is far superior to the cold kind, and takes much less time to finish. Any advice to get us started on the right track? Be sure you are not overwatering–tomatoes that have been in the garden a few weeks can be watered every three or four days. Allow the first inch of soil to dry before watering again. Pale leaves may also be an indication of pest insects feeding on the leaves; check the undersides of leaves to be sure pest insects are not harboring there. Roses, the world’s favourite flowers, are great garden performers that, if well cared for, will live for many years. Utah State University Extension provides informal education outreach to residents throughout the state. This question-and-answer column is designed to give you research-based information whether your gardening interest is producing fresh food, creating a landscape area or anything in between. The key to your small-space urban gardening success has a lot to do with the types of pots or planters you select. As we gardeners say “NEXT year things will be better!” Hace you thought trying industrial hemp? I read is fantastic for replacing hay and for mulching! Not expensive at all. Research it and let me know. I wish I had land but I am a balcony gardener :-). Blessings! Dear Real Living: I read with significant consternation the Friday, Jan. 17, article headlined « Prevent a garden slugfest with baits, maintenance. » Perhaps my having attended Pentacle Theatre’s production of « Dr. Doolittle » inspired me to point out a gross injustice. The article itself was fine, but the accompanying photo clearly pictured a Pacific banana slug (Ariolimax columbianus). This species, by far the largest and most obvious slug in our parts, is NOT a garden pest. These critters feed on detritus and dead plant material, not on living vegetation. As such, they actually help clean up our yards, not exfoliate them. Unfortunately, the SJ article will most certainly encourage people not aware of these slugs’ good intentions to dispatch them at every opportunity. Bad for the garden, truly tragic for the banana slugs. — Alex Bourdeau, West Salem There can be a few reasons for yellowing leaves. This article will help you pinpoint the cause. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/yellow-tomato-leaves.htm I have been doing deep mulch since reading your glowing experiences. I was also worried about herbicide issues when my cucumbers failed to thrive. But I replanted a little later in the season and they eventually took off. I have had great luck so far, only one year in. However, I have used old hay that had been sitting outside composting in the elements for over a year. Maybe you can buy big round bales and let them sit somewhere outside for a year or two until any possible herbicides have had a chance to decompose. It’s usually cheap or even free to get from people who can’t feed their spoiled hay to their livestock. So sorry for your bad luck. It’s so disappointing to lose a garden or even just a crop after all the optimism and effort that was put into it. “The Garden Bible” is built on case studies of fantastic-looking and functional garden spaces that started as problematic landscapes. The issues may not at first appear apparent because the solutions work so well. Books are great sources of gardening information! We love to help gardeners here at Gardening Know How, we are a great source of information and love to help with all your garden questions! Not sure what the problem is? Or stuck on how to solve it? Get in touch with our friendly gardening experts today who will be happy to point you in the right direction. 600px wide Vegepod is a garden bed with a greenhouse effect to protect from pests. Photo: Vegepod Dudeni, if it’s thick clay and north facing, I’d consider going grass less. You’ll never get a good lawn with those conditions. You’ll be permanently fighting moss and bad drainage. Your problem isn’t easily rectified and lack of sun is something you can’t solve. I’d seriously consider a different style of garden. The calendar says it is January, but gardening enthusiasts have already begun planning for spring.  Seeds are being ordered, grow lights are being tested and garden centers will have a run on grow pots. Every gardener wants to improve upon last year’s results. Many will try to new strategies to protect against the pest that drove them crazy the previous year.  A big pest is the deer that come to browse in your yard. These beautiful creatures have now become a nuisance and your hard work and planning will have been in vain! If you are suspicious, but have not actually seen the deer snacking, footprints and droppings are a sure sign that they have been in your yard.  Also, typical signs of deer damage are plants with ripped or jagged edges leaves and tree bark with score marks.   An adult deer eats 6-10 pounds of greenery per day so you will need a definite plan to keep the deer out of the garden.  A fence is a sure way to keep them out, but costly and may take away from the natural beauty of your property.  Deer resistant plants can be planted around the plants that the deer are targeting. For example: plants with furred leaves or spines and that have a strong smell will be less appealing to them. Surround your garden with herbs with a strong scent which will mask the aroma of your annuals. Repellents are another way to deter deer. Because deer have such a keen sense of smell repellents can be very effective.  Just as the wonderful smell of your flower garden attracts, repellents can do the opposite with odoriferous ingredients.  Bobbex Deer Repellent is proven the most effective on the market and can be used year-round to protect against the deer.  So while you are planning your garden, plan on all natural, environmentally friendly Bobbex Deer and Animal Repellents. Creating a two-level garden linked by steps and flanked by split-level pools fed with waterfalls gives the space more interest. The design is bordered by raised flowerbeds and built-in bench seating, which can seat more guests than garden chairs. A colourful buddleia is an ideal standard plant for this kind of garden; easy to care for, it will attract lots of bees and butterflies when it flowers. Good luck, hope Brian helps protect your back garden so you can continue enjoying the birdlife . 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