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so what about the garden that won’t ‘develope ‘ root crops?? What would you suggest to deter monkeys from raiding the garden? Solution: While there is no one-size-fits-all solution for pests, there is one thing you can do to reduce the chances of your landscape becoming an all-you-can-eat buffet: garden in raised beds. While this won’t solve all your problems, a raised bed helps deter small- and medium-sized animals. Add a fence or netting to deter deer and birds as well.  No garden, no problem: What can you grow in your apartment? Comments What is the problem with your garden? Will it take much looking after? Once planted, this garden will look after itself — aside from the odd pruning of climbers, such as clematis, and the addition of some bright summer blooms, like lilies or poppies. I have a small garden so I use my grass clippings for the deep mulch method. For the first time since moving to Idaho (southwestern corner) I have a garden that has been producing in all the heat we get each summer. Unfortunately weeds started taking over my grass and I had to apply broad-leaf herbicide. Lucky for me I read some where that it kills tomato plants before I applied those grass cuttings to my garden. How can I cut costs? Raised beds look great, but will cost money to install, so you could opt for ground-level planting. Small gardens are more interesting if you add extras, like water features, but you could replace these with more borders and swap decorative paving for gravel or decking. My son, having not been able to secure work since he left school two-and-a-half years ago, recently started helping a friend doing gardening work part time. He is paid a more or less fixed sum each day, and is no longer signing on. Oh my gosh I’m so sorry this happened to you! How discouraging. I hope you are able to enjoy at least some produce from your small garden by your house. And I certainly hope next year is much, much better! My lawn guy was giving me grass clippings from my yard as well as the neighbors – but I stopped doing that because I think the neighbor had their yard sprayed with a weed killer of some kind and it got into my compost. I think my garden that season was poisoned by the compost. Now I just use clippings from my own yard because I know they’re not sprayed with anything. We used Milestone weed killer in the past on our spotted knapweed. It is an aminopyralid. The label is very specific with the warnings about plant sensitivity, even certain pine and fir trees are sensitive. If you spray a pasture, animals do not have to be removed and there is no meat/milk withdrawl (just quoting the labels, here), but they do warn about moving the animals to a pasture with susceptible species (clover, alfalfa, etc.) within a certain number of days and all manure must be aged for at least one year before being used on susceptible crops. Unfortunately, unless we grow everything ourselves, we never know what has been used. I did have an issue like that one year, and it was way back when I had used the aminopyralid spray and planted some extra tomato plants outside the general garden area and that is exactly how they looked. Unfortunately, a lot of people start to think about composting in the Spring. They’re anxious to get out in the garden, have heard—or know—that compost is a great natural fertilizer, soil amendment and disease preventer, and want to get a pile going. But nine times out of ten—maybe more like 9.9 times out of ten—they don’t have THE most important ingredient: Shredded fall leaves. I, too, know your pain and despair. We live on the western edge of Wyoming at 6000′. Our sons raise cattle, so left-over hay and manure from the cows and horses was easy to obtain. About mid way through the 2014 gardening season, after mulching my peas they just stopped. Hmm, must have been the heat. The beans were just a fair crop that year. 2015, no potatoes, no beans, no peas. They all came up beautifully, but when they started to put out roots – they became stunted, yellowed, twisted, and eventually died. The corn wasn’t bothered. Nor the pumpkin. I thought slugs, virus, disease, too much water. By the end of 2015, research was pointing to contamination. This year, began the same way. Transplants were healthy until put into the garden. Seeds germinate then look awful. After much research – I stopped using the manure tea (it seemed to be the worst culprit – maybe because it is concentrated). Planted all the radish seed I had. The ones I didn’t pick are the size of large potatoes and up to 4′ tall. Started more brassica transplants and planted them all over the garden. Interestingly, where I planted radishes or brassicas next to the peas, the peas actually produced a few peas and did not die immediately. Also, putting fermented molasses water on the potatoes seemed to help a little. We are now looking at cover crops as a way to help remediate. And all the wood stove ash will be dumped in the garden this winter. Start small From windowsill herb planters, garden towers and even hanging baskets – these are ideal for an apartment window or a mini-balcony. It’s also the perfect place to start if you have limited outdoor space. I, too, know your pain and despair. We live on the western edge of Wyoming at 6000′. Our sons raise cattle, so left-over hay and manure from the cows and horses was easy to obtain. About mid way through the 2014 gardening season, after mulching my peas they just stopped. Hmm, must have been the heat. The beans were just a fair crop that year. 2015, no potatoes, no beans, no peas. They all came up beautifully, but when they started to put out roots – they became stunted, yellowed, twisted, and eventually died. The corn wasn’t bothered. Nor the pumpkin. I thought slugs, virus, disease, too much water. By the end of 2015, research was pointing to contamination. This year, began the same way. Transplants were healthy until put into the garden. Seeds germinate then look awful. After much research – I stopped using the manure tea (it seemed to be the worst culprit – maybe because it is concentrated). Planted all the radish seed I had. The ones I didn’t pick are the size of large potatoes and up to 4′ tall. Started more brassica transplants and planted them all over the garden. Interestingly, where I planted radishes or brassicas next to the peas, the peas actually produced a few peas and did not die immediately. Also, putting fermented molasses water on the potatoes seemed to help a little. We are now looking at cover crops as a way to help remediate. And all the wood stove ash will be dumped in the garden this winter. failing garden featured garden gardening Plants vegetables Kendra Wilson has access to some of the most remarkable gardens in England, while dissecting them for the online publication Gardenista. With experience as a writer, picture editor, and designer for Vogue, Condé Nast Traveler, and Observer Food Monthly, she brings her unique perspective to the way gardens look and why they work. My garden is a field Hi, sounds like sparrowhawk and not local cats to blame then! I was upset thinking the cat had got it for no other reason than to play with it as they certainly aren’t hungry(unless they are feral cats) as you say its nature and sparrowhawk has to eat. i find it hard with cats as its not for food, its just for fun, know that’s how cats are and don’t like them because of it! They wreak havoc on the natural wildlife and poo in your garden to boot! 🙂 VigRX BioBelt Atlant Gel Tonus Fortis BeMass Zevs Erozon Max VigRX Plus eracto power up premium

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