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Perhaps your problem isn’t prying eyes, but voracious appetites. There’s a whole litany of garden pests that can make short work of your plants and of all the work you’ve put into growing them. Fortunately, you’re not helpless against your plant-devouring foes. In the resources that I provide on pest control, I try to give you as many choices as possible. Don’t like to use poisons? No problem: I offer organic landscaping solutions, too. Don’t want to remove the pests entirely from your property, preferring instead merely to fence them out? Again, no problem. Just browse my pest control resources on groundhogs, rabbits, voles, and deer, and you’re bound to find a landscaping solution that suits your needs and tastes. I detest orange in the garden  I also had some problems with straw bale gardening. At least with manure you test a sample before you put it on the garden. Just water some bean or tomato seedlings with some compost tea made from your manure. To speed up the recovery, till the soil frequently to allow the sun to cook it. Small gardens and raised beds can be solarized. Soak them down deeply with water, cover with clear plastic and cook them for a month in the sun. If the pea test fails again, cook them another month. Good question– we have had slightly less rain this year– but I’ve watered sufficiently. And we’ve had other dry years where the garden still thrived, so it’s hard to say for sure. In the first test the best option is to choose the bucket that allows to water the segment of length 3. We can’t choose the bucket that allows to water the segment of length 5 because then we can’t water the whole garden. Dear Real Living: I read with significant consternation the Friday, Jan. 17, article headlined « Prevent a garden slugfest with baits, maintenance. » Perhaps my having attended Pentacle Theatre’s production of « Dr. Doolittle » inspired me to point out a gross injustice. The article itself was fine, but the accompanying photo clearly pictured a Pacific banana slug (Ariolimax columbianus). This species, by far the largest and most obvious slug in our parts, is NOT a garden pest. These critters feed on detritus and dead plant material, not on living vegetation. As such, they actually help clean up our yards, not exfoliate them. Unfortunately, the SJ article will most certainly encourage people not aware of these slugs’ good intentions to dispatch them at every opportunity. Bad for the garden, truly tragic for the banana slugs. — Alex Bourdeau, West Salem What’s the secret behind creating a successful small garden design? Planning, of course! Working to a detailed layout drawing, that’s to scale and taken into account the practicalities of the space will save you time and money in the long run. This article looks at practical aspects of designing a small garden but do take a look at our gallery packed with small garden ideas if you’re looking for something more inspirational. It is guaranteed that there is at least one bucket such that it is possible to water the garden in integer number of hours using only this bucket. The grey garden slug, Derocerus reticulatum, is a major pest in gardens throughout the Willamette Valley. This slug eats a leaf in a garden.  (Photo: Robin Rosetta of the Oregon Stat) I am sooo grateful for this post! I have had “bad luck” with my tomatos for the past 3 to 4 years, and I could not for the life of me figure out what I was doing wrong! Now I see that I had done the same as you had, adding manure (from my neighbors aged cow manure pile) to our garden. I used to grow beautiful tomatos, and beamed with pride at my quarts of lovely canned tomatos lined up on my shelf, waiting to be enjoyed in the midst of winter! I guess pride came before the fall! LOL! I have tried everything I could think of to try to deal with the problem, even moving all my tomatos to big pots on my porch, BUT I was still using soil from my garden! AhHa! My mom had a bumper crop of tomatos this year, using big pots on her porch, but the only soil she used was Miracle Gro Moisture Control soil, and I am going to do this next year! I don’t like having to buy soil when we have access to all the free manure to amend our soil, but, in light of this info, I think that we may have to, at least for our tomato plants. I have not noticed any of my other plants having the problems like the tomatos, so at least my garden will not be totally unusable next summer. Thank you so much for all the info!!! 🙂 Blessings, and Happy Fall! 🙂 Books are great sources of gardening information! We love to help gardeners here at Gardening Know How, we are a great source of information and love to help with all your garden questions! Pollinate with brush, or by shaking plant so that pollen will fall to female flowers (depending on kind). Attract pollinators to garden. Do not kill pollinating insects. But what if you want to live a healthier lifestyle and grow your own food? What if you’re time poor or you don’t have the space to maintain a large garden to grow your own food? Alternatively, creating a soakaway may be the answer. This requires a large hole at the lowest point of the garden and filled with rubble or broken bricks, and then covered with 300mm of soil. The soakaway will need to be quite large to have the desired effect – up to 1.8m (6 ft.) deep and the same across. There is not always a need for underground pipes to a soakaway although on land that has insufficient gradient to drain into a soakaway naturally, underground drain pipes of some sort will be required. Both clay and plastic pipes are available – the latter being easier to use and lighter to handle. Strong shapes such as circles (arranged diagonally) will make a small garden appear wider and longer. At the heart of this garden is an open grassy circle (to give kids room to run about), while the smaller paved circles are used as seating/dining areas. Stepping stones lead to a tucked-away play area. Children will also love the shape of the allium plant, or ornamental onion. It flowers in early summer, likes most soils and is easy to care for. I do not know if you would even have a possibly source available near you being in a prairie. However, perhaps look into the Back to Eden style of no till garden. The method uses chipped/shredded wood(tree trimmings) as a mulch and with adding regular compost, which gets distributed down through the chips, it is wonderful(so far at least) and does great things. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/vines/clematis/clematis-with-yellow-leaves.htm My biggest problem with my garden is trees! We have a shelterbelt around our whole acreage that includes several rows of trees which are beautiful but we get no sun! So: you either 1) love moles enough to leave them alone, in which case they’ll constantly dig up your yard/ruin your garden, or 2) you like your lawn/garden without mole tunnels and mounds MORE than you love moles, which means getting rid of the moles by either trapping/re-homing them (which, as I said, will kill them 99 times out of 100) or setting kill traps. Strong shapes such as circles (arranged diagonally) will make a small garden appear wider and longer. At the heart of this garden is an open grassy circle (to give kids room to run about), while the smaller paved circles are used as seating/dining areas. Stepping stones lead to a tucked-away play area. Children will also love the shape of the allium plant, or ornamental onion. 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