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My garden is too small tui gardentui pettui at home My garden has been a « fail » the last couple of years…not sure what’s wrong….fertilizer, too wet, bad soil, ???? While I was away from my house for a year, no one tended to my garden. I came back and the weeds were 10′ tall! They had also taken root in the brick walkways and caused a lot of upheal of blocks. Now, no matter how many weeds I pull, more keep coming back. And the roots of some are so huge and can’t even be dug pu without disturbing so many bricks and the raised garden beds. What can I do, short of ripping everything out sand starting all over? Hi Jill, I am new to Prairie Homestead, maybe a month or so. I have just had the time to sit down and start to catch up on all the info in your tool boxes ( we have just had our first snow/blizzard here in Tea, SD, so officially done with the garden.) I can now sit and rest a while :). I was just reading about your tomato catastrophe, so sorry. It is so hard to watch your hard work curl up and die and then not know why. I was wondering if you have ever used worm castings (Poo). My husband and I started using it about 3 years ago. Our gardens are the best they have ever been. Its 100%pure, OMRI certified.You can’t burn your vegetation, its safe around children and animals, heck you could eat it if you wanted to-my husband tried- he’s weird 🙂 It is an excellent soil builder also. I’m going to do something here, hope its OK. This is our side business now. We took a full growing season to test it out for ourselves before we made up our minds to sell it as whole sale distributors. Anyway this may be something you may want to check out. We use it with our composted leaves and grass clippings. I can not remember the last time we even entertained the idea of using any kind of harmful chemical on anything in & around our yard and gardens. We have read so much about this and it really hits home, knowing what goes into your body is just 1/2 the fight and you have to stay ever so vigilant. Well I hope that I was somewhat helpful for you. If you would like any information about Worm poop, I will send you a website so you can check it out for yourself. Wishing you & yours Good Luck in the next growing season. Shawn PS.I enjoy the rest during this time of year but I’m already thinking/planning my garden plots out for next year 😉 Helping you find solutions to common insect pests, diseases and weeds in your garden. Good luck, hope Brian helps protect your back garden so you can continue enjoying the birdlife . Q. Mike: I’m hoping you can help kick-start a new program at our community garden. Historically, we’ve had one large cold compost heap that was an unmanaged eyesore. The « compost committee » has chosen to move in a new direction and have the individual gardeners create and manage their own composting. Some gardeners are planning to group together and build large 3-bin systems; others just want a small pile for their own 10 x 10 plot. Either way, we’re urging them to learn ‘hot composting’ techniques, as I know that compost that heats up quickly is far superior to the cold kind, and takes much less time to finish. Any advice to get us started on the right track? I drew a picture of a garden and a sidewalk being built around the outside. The height of the inside (garden) was 17 ft and the width was 20 feet. Then, I made a 3-foot corner around all four corners of the garden. So, the height of the exterior was 17 + 3 + 3 = 23 feet, while the width was 3 + 3 + 20 = 26 feet. So, the perimeter of the inside is 74 feet and the perimeter of the outside is 98 feet. I added these two to get 172 feet as the total perimeter. Inexorably, I deemed that 172 feet of lumber was needed for the perimeter of the walk. Is that safe to assume or am I misinterpreting the question/what it is asking for? I am getting a bit « tripped up » of the fact that the problem gave me that, « to make the forms for the cement, we will need to buy some 2-by-4-inch lumber. » The next phase of the lesson encouraged exploring different size gardens – first 6 plants … then 10 … then 20. Lots of work with materials and lots of recording. Some children gave up modelling and began drawing, especially when the number of plants got bigger. IDC’s ‘Three Platforms’ definition30 (first: mainframe, second: client/server, third: mobile/social) gives us some insight into just how important any ethical obligations in the walled-garden ecosystems will be over time – each platform is typified by orders of magnitude more applications that might be used by consumers, thus increasing the number of potential vectors from which users might be adversely impacted. As such, it will likely require ongoing vigilance from users and independent security/data protection groups, as well as the likes of Apple and Google in order to limit user exposure to fraud, and this is an area that will undoubtedly receive increasing attention as smartphones and other highly portable computing devices grow in use, particularly where such use supplants older generation services. Will it take much looking after? Raised beds can be much easier to look after than borders and you won’t need to get on all fours to tend them. The rest of this garden is given over to paving, which will only need an occasional sweep. What sets us apart? David is a registered member of the Society of Garden Designers, a member of the British Association of Landscape Industries and has the title of Grand Designs Show Garden designer. He also mentors qualified garden designers and has worked many years in the garden design industry. My garden is on a steep slope In the years I’ve been advocating for the deep mulch method of gardening, I’ve had a couple people ask if I’ve ever had problems using non-organic hay. We get our hay from a variety of sources, and looking back, I’m almost certain some of it had to be sprayed at some point. However, as I always had thriving gardens by using our compost and hay mulch, I figured people who were concerned about non-organic hay or non-organic animal manure were worrying unnecessarily. I was wrong. My garden is a field My lawn guy was giving me grass clippings from my yard as well as the neighbors – but I stopped doing that because I think the neighbor had their yard sprayed with a weed killer of some kind and it got into my compost. I think my garden that season was poisoned by the compost. Now I just use clippings from my own yard because I know they’re not sprayed with anything. Grow disease-resistant varieties. Keep garden weed free and clean. Solution: Don’t fight the rocks; design a rock garden. Rocks add visual appeal and function to anchor the soil. Plant rock crevices with drought-tolerant plants such as ice plant and sedum as a form of xeriscaping. This can be very frustrating! https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/deer/deer-repellents.htm Do you have access to wood chips? We do deep wood chips the same way you use hay and it works great in our area. We have access to free chips easily though. You can’t mix them in the soil and you plant below them. They turn into compost and build up the top soil over time. We add fresh chips 2 times a year to the top. Sorry about the garden! Masculin Active TestX Core Testogen eracto Zevs Erozon Max Atlant Gel BioBelt power up premium Anabolic Rx24

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