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My garden is too small I’ve alluded several times in my newsletter, and here on the blog, that I’ve had a rather bizarre, and quite unproductive gardening year. Related: find out how to deter cats from your garden. On top of all that, we have loads of ready made designs for you to download that will help you transform your garden into something really beautiful. Once again, it is always better to have as many different plants in the blend as feasible, in recognition of the “more the merrier” principle. A good home garden cover crop blend might include ryegrass, barley, wheat, lucerne, three clovers, daikon radish, kale and silverbeet. You will note that all species are edible here and you could easily snip as required for a chlorophyll-packed addition to your green smoothie. You could even juice the young wheatgrass and barley grass at the height of their antioxidant powers. In Sam and Jill’s garden there are two sorts of ladybirds. There are red Seven-Spot ladybirds with $7$ black spots and shiny black Four-Spot ladybirds with $4$ red spots. In the years I’ve been advocating for the deep mulch method of gardening, I’ve had a couple people ask if I’ve ever had problems using non-organic hay. We get our hay from a variety of sources, and looking back, I’m almost certain some of it had to be sprayed at some point. However, as I always had thriving gardens by using our compost and hay mulch, I figured people who were concerned about non-organic hay or non-organic animal manure were worrying unnecessarily. I was wrong. I keep reading everyone’s posts because I thought I was the only one with strange results. I also am interested in hearing about other woodchippers. I have the following comments to add: 1. I’ve been a woodchipper (Paul Gautschi, Back to Eden) for three years now and every year the soil gets better as the plants reveal…but one has to be patient with the process, like investing over the years before payoff. Once payoff happens (the right balance of soil chemistry with microorganisms), less work and more productivity is expected. So fertilize your plants to compensate before that magic year which I will be doing in my fourth year. 2. I didn’t plant my tomatoes deeply enough below the 4″ woodchip layer — my mistake — and my results were very disappointing with curly leaves, too much die off. I put new plants in at the beginning of August at a deep level, and they’re doing well, except yellowing at bottom…we haven’t had much rain here. 3. my potatoes are doing excellent — buried deep below the chips. 4. Chips are challenging with root crops while the soil is still building, so I’m doing a garden bed without chips next year and for several years more. 5. there is definitely a larger picture in which the pollution of our skies and water is a factor, which makes me want to stick with chips for greater protection, though our productivity may still be affected. The pollution dries out the soil and hurts plant growth. 6, yes I think one has to do their best to avoid chips which were herbicide-treated before cut down. 7. I would like to get chickens to help with the gardening tilling and fertilizing. If you are currently deep-mulching and having great results, you don’t really have anything to worry about, although I wouldn’t recommend adding any more hay to your garden until you are sure of its history. I have people emailing me CONSTANTLY with glowing reports of their deep hay mulch, and I’ve had beautiful results as well, so I don’t think *all* hay is a problem, and if you can verify your hay/straw is clean, I would absolutely still use it. Where: One of the most destructive pests of both garden variety and wild asparagus. Many gardens are overrun with the slow-moving creatures. so what about the garden that won’t ‘develope ‘ root crops?? A range of products and hand-picked gardening offers exclusively for Saga customers. Office hours: 9-5:30pm Mon-Fri; 9-4pm Sat; Closed Sun (but if the weather is really lovely – we’re probably all out in the sunshine gardening, so please leave a message). So how can you keep rodents out the garden, and from potentially entering your home?  Hi Hazel, thank you for that. Have never had nest box as neither me or partner great at DIY. My garden is very wildlife friendly as in a lot of it is untouched! I have 2 large hedges, laurel in front & I don’t know what the other one is usual hedging plant(box?), but it is a bit of a monster now, probably 15ft, neighbour has asked if he could cut it to 8ft which is fine as long as he does it soon before nesting starts. 🙂 There can be a few reasons for yellowing leaves. This article will help you pinpoint the cause. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/yellow-tomato-leaves.htm i just got a raised pnalter .3 5 and 22in tall. I plan on growing herbs in it (maybe a vegetable, too). What kind of soil/mix of soil should i use to fill it.a cheaper version seems to be 3 cubic foot bags of garden soil by Kellogg any opinions?should I mix in compost..how much?should i add any sand?worms?anything else?I am new to this and want to do it right.Thanks for your help. but the metals get into our water supply so now we need filters to water the garden… not sure how to do that yet. Helping you find solutions to common insect pests, diseases and weeds in your garden. Just joined but looking for some advice please on the garden which has dying grass – yellow, dead and some green. Facebook Inc. is seeking to address a common critique of its advertising platform—that it keeps the data it knows about its users in a so-called walled garden that limits retailers’ ability to understand the effectiveness of their ads on the social network, Instagram and Audience Network, which is its mobile ad network. You’re welcome am66,  I hope you continue to enjoy your bird friendly garden and see lots of nice visitors, especially during the spring season.  If you have a nesting box you may find a Blue Tit will find your garden and maybe raise a brood.  There is lots of information on this website for nesting boxes and attracting more birds into the garden.  If you do want to add a nesting box, for better success try facing it between North and East direction and about 10ft off the ground.  For sparrows you could put a box under the eaves of the house.      Good luck, sounds like you have a lovely garden with shrubs to attract the birds 🙂 What’s the secret behind creating a successful small garden design? Planning, of course! Working to a detailed layout drawing, that’s to scale and taken into account the practicalities of the space will save you time and money in the long run. This article looks at practical aspects of designing a small garden but do take a look at our gallery packed with small garden ideas if you’re looking for something more inspirational. The problem with my garden is that I’m getting a new home and it doesn’t exist yet. So … you’ve been reading my garden columns and I’ve convinced you that if a former news anchor can grow a garden on a balcony, how hard can it be? Wow, I am sorry to hear about your garden! I have also been using the deep mulch method for several years, but with our own hay, which hasn’t had herbicides on it other than the fast dissipating round up used on spots. I hadn’t had this issue, but I have been very mindful of it. I’ve had many more issues with the grass growing after the hay breaks down. It literally doesn’t matter how deep I put the mulch, we will have a bunch of weeds and grass. But the soil is rich! We live in southern Mississippi. We have plenty of stuff growing everywhere. You might do better with using the grass you cut out of your yard. TestX Core Atlant Gel erogran Masculin Active eracto el macho Penigen 500 VigRX deseo power up premium

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