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Lydia’s box garden. There were gardeners in the Bulkley Valley/Skeena Valley (BC, Canada) that used hay and straw/manure contaminated with Grazon (picloram) – widely used to combat broadleaf weeds. I was aware of that so could take precautions and did some testing with my straw for mulching and that I also use for my chickens. Everyone can do it at home to make sure it is not contaminated. Grazon has a long half life therefore gardeners in our area had to dig soil about 3 feet deep and exchange with not contaminated topsoil/compost mix and start new. Big job and sometimes quite expensive. Before adding compost/hay/straw/manure do the simple test and be sure your herbicide free Here is the link to an article explaining the bioassay method to test for herbicides http://northword.ca/features/environment/mean-manure-killer-compost-grazon-after-effects-in-the-bulkley-valley/ Hope this is of help! Monika Just a few blocks away from the garden, Eileen Burns mixes drinks at Californos in Westport. The result is a scenario most gardeners at some point face: an ever-growing tower of pots and flats languishing in the shed, eventually to be thrown out. Report that your garden waste was not collected, or that your bin is damaged or missing. Finally, an answer to what happened to me this year. I had a beautiful bed of over 6′ tomato plants in my 6×6 garden I had carefully filled with rich earth composted in with commercial manure sold locally only to have them start with the curling leaves and withered plants. No insect damage, no sign of over watering or blight, just green withered leaves. Never happened before, blamed it on plants being diseased from purchase but had several different varieties. Now after reading all this info I have a different perspective. Not sure I’ll try again next year but if I do, I’ll certainly research back to this blog. Thank you for posting. Where: Browsers are found nibbling on gardens, tender perennials and young trees. As you can see from the attached photos, we require some privacy by the low fence, but would like to keep the garden bed as you approach from the street side (seen on the right in the photograph). We’re not worried about keeping the grass – paving and gravel are fine. We look forward to seeing what you can come up with for us. Joan and Jim Gooch, Tauranga Thank you for sharing this. It certainly would have been easier to just blog the good events. We have noticed residual effects from straw we have got from non-organic neighbors (our organic friends won’t sell straw as it is returned to the soil). I would try a trial with some plants in the garden next year to see if the results are the same (even if you don’t intend to harvest and use). The reason I say this is that we have had a weird gardening season here as well with low results on a number of vegetable crops (and we are not the only ones to see the same thing). Not the same problems as you describe but far from typical. Hopefully this is an aberration for you and not a contamination issue. I enjoy you site and wish you the best. Malta has made significant inroads into improving sustainability, as reflected in the M&G Garden 2017. These lessons – compost more, recycle water wherever possible, grow native plants – are ones easily brought home to any garden for the wider benefit of the environment. James’ design proves that putting the right plant in the right place creates a healthy environment. Crucially, they will inspire garden lovers to turn what were once problem patches into areas of opportunity and growth. Dear Carol, We have a problem area which we are keen to see turned into a stylish courtyard. The site faces east and only receives the morning sun. The soil quality is reasonable but will require additional nutrients (the house was tenanted for 15 years – the last eight by non-gardeners). We thought of having a perfumed garden area, and we like hydrangeas and star jasmine as well as the sound of trickling water. Solution: While there is no one-size-fits-all solution for pests, there is one thing you can do to reduce the chances of your landscape becoming an all-you-can-eat buffet: garden in raised beds. While this won’t solve all your problems, a raised bed helps deter small- and medium-sized animals. Add a fence or netting to deter deer and birds as well.  Through its county agents, the Cooperative Extension Service gives individuals access to the resources at land-grant universities across the nation. These universities are centers for research in many subjects, including entomology (the study of insects) and agriculture. Each county within the United States has an Extension office, which is staffed with agents who work closely with university-based Extension specialists to deliver answers to your questions about gardening, agriculture, and pest control. You can find the phone number for your local county extension office in the local government section (often marked with blue pages) of your telephone directory or by clicking on the map below. “(A major step is) developing a master plan that you can follow all at once or slowly as you can afford to tackle all parts of your yard,” she added. “This is so important so the look is cohesive, and you don’t have to go back and rip up a vegetable garden when you realize that was the spot for your terrace.” The foods to help your soil microbes survive and thrive are now readily available for home gardeners. The bacterial component of your soil loves simple carbohydrates. Molasses is a good option, but even table sugar is of benefit because we are chasing the energy factor more than the extra minerals found in molasses. The ideal dose rates for both involve two tablespoons of either sugar or molasses, in a watering can full of water, applied to 10 m2 of soil. So: you either 1) love moles enough to leave them alone, in which case they’ll constantly dig up your yard/ruin your garden, or 2) you like your lawn/garden without mole tunnels and mounds MORE than you love moles, which means getting rid of the moles by either trapping/re-homing them (which, as I said, will kill them 99 times out of 100) or setting kill traps. Is a white garden a cliché? We have loads of tips and garden advice so you can find a solution to most common garden problems alongside practical solutions for sorting them out. Several years ago, i had a problem with something eating strawberries in my garden. I put out glue boards (2) to catch whatever it was, and caught 2 cardinals, both of which were killed by the glue boards. Not a pretty site….and i was devastated. I will never use glue boards again….and am always sure to plant enough for everyone/everything….. i have trouble with critters eating my garden Help solve your gardening problem. Here are the answers to some commonly asked gardening questions with hints, tips and advice on getting the best results from your garden. Images Publishing, the Australian book company, is based in Victoria, a state with a similar climate to California on the southeast coast of the island continent. Many of the design and gardening challenges (such as smaller spaces, less water) faced by Californians can apply to gardens down under, too. In her latest book, The Problem with My Garden, she offers savvy solutions, insightful advice and inspiration for dealing with specific gardening problems. Read on to learn more about this Laurence King Publishing book and enter to win one of 3 copies! In the years I’ve been advocating for the deep mulch method of gardening, I’ve had a couple people ask if I’ve ever had problems using non-organic hay. We get our hay from a variety of sources, and looking back, I’m almost certain some of it had to be sprayed at some point. However, as I always had thriving gardens by using our compost and hay mulch, I figured people who were concerned about non-organic hay or non-organic animal manure were worrying unnecessarily. I was wrong. BioBelt Penigen 500 eracto Testogen Zevs Tonus Fortis el macho Masculin Active power up premium eracto

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