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Garden Gift Hub is one of the most thoughtful and interesting places on the web to find original and useful gardening and nature inspired products. Good morning. I have the same problem and have not used the same products as you. My veggies have been very small and take longer to grow. I have spoken with many growers even those with roadside stands. We are all having the same problem. I’ve been fortunate to have produced more than some of the others. I do have a container garden. But have the curling leaves and small produce. Just thought I’d pass along a little extra info for you. Remedies: Water more! Set up a small irrigation system to water for you at regular intervals. Add shade cloth to garden beds to help reduce water evaporation. Mix more clay or soil into your garden bed to improve its ability to hold water. Adding mulch may also help plants conserve water. Hi Hazel, thank you for that. Have never had nest box as neither me or partner great at DIY. My garden is very wildlife friendly as in a lot of it is untouched! I have 2 large hedges, laurel in front & I don’t know what the other one is usual hedging plant(box?), but it is a bit of a monster now, probably 15ft, neighbour has asked if he could cut it to 8ft which is fine as long as he does it soon before nesting starts. 🙂 Sign up to receive our eco newsletter full of great organic gardening tips plus product updates and offers. 3. Your book features 57 gardening dilemmas and solutions for those dilemmas. How did you determine which dilemmas to include? Were they based on personal experience or did you survey a lot of gardeners to find the most common dilemmas? Is a follow-up book in the works with more gardening dilemmas? There are issues which come up again and again, like ‘My yard is too long and narrow’. I tend to write for people who are not horticultural experts but are design-aware (like me) and I see gardens on these terms. For a while I was gardening for a book publisher whose long, narrow garden was the length of a city block. It was difficult to rationalize the space. When I saw designer Chris Moss’s London garden, which is compartmentalized in a clever way, it stuck in my mind and was the first ‘problem’ to go into the book. With increasing amounts of mole hills on her lawn and moles now burrowing under her flowerbed, Tiffany Daneff looks at ways of controlling the moles in her garden. Hi Jill, I am new to Prairie Homestead, maybe a month or so. I have just had the time to sit down and start to catch up on all the info in your tool boxes ( we have just had our first snow/blizzard here in Tea, SD, so officially done with the garden.) I can now sit and rest a while :). I was just reading about your tomato catastrophe, so sorry. It is so hard to watch your hard work curl up and die and then not know why. I was wondering if you have ever used worm castings (Poo). My husband and I started using it about 3 years ago. Our gardens are the best they have ever been. Its 100%pure, OMRI certified.You can’t burn your vegetation, its safe around children and animals, heck you could eat it if you wanted to-my husband tried- he’s weird 🙂 It is an excellent soil builder also. I’m going to do something here, hope its OK. This is our side business now. We took a full growing season to test it out for ourselves before we made up our minds to sell it as whole sale distributors. Anyway this may be something you may want to check out. We use it with our composted leaves and grass clippings. I can not remember the last time we even entertained the idea of using any kind of harmful chemical on anything in & around our yard and gardens. We have read so much about this and it really hits home, knowing what goes into your body is just 1/2 the fight and you have to stay ever so vigilant. Well I hope that I was somewhat helpful for you. If you would like any information about Worm poop, I will send you a website so you can check it out for yourself. Wishing you & yours Good Luck in the next growing season. Shawn PS.I enjoy the rest during this time of year but I’m already thinking/planning my garden plots out for next year 😉 If you find you are having trouble with your garden, consider whether you’re making one of the above mistakes. It is always a good idea to consult with your local gardening center or any green thumbs you know if you are having a problem with your garden. A garden can be an extremely rewarding, relaxing activity once you have everything set up properly I have a small garden so I use my grass clippings for the deep mulch method. For the first time since moving to Idaho (southwestern corner) I have a garden that has been producing in all the heat we get each summer. Unfortunately weeds started taking over my grass and I had to apply broad-leaf herbicide. Lucky for me I read some where that it kills tomato plants before I applied those grass cuttings to my garden. I had a similar problem this year…new garden…new wood mulch…some things did great, tomatoes failed. I did research and it says wood and straw mulch can do good at first but they PULL THE NITROGEN out of the soil so the plants can fail. I believe that’s what happened. My research said compost OR leaf mulch is actually the best for your garden. Dudeni, if it’s thick clay and north facing, I’d consider going grass less. You’ll never get a good lawn with those conditions. You’ll be permanently fighting moss and bad drainage. Your problem isn’t easily rectified and lack of sun is something you can’t solve. I’d seriously consider a different style of garden. A garden is one of the most important aspects of a self-reliant lifestyle. They provide a means of growing your own food and gardening itself is a very rewarding activity. However, some people aren’t blessed with a green thumb and can find themselves struggling to keep their plants alive. The calendar says it is January, but gardening enthusiasts have already begun planning for spring.  Seeds are being ordered, grow lights are being tested and garden centers will have a run on grow pots. Every gardener wants to improve upon last year’s results. Many will try to new strategies to protect against the pest that drove them crazy the previous year.  A big pest is the deer that come to browse in your yard. These beautiful creatures have now become a nuisance and your hard work and planning will have been in vain! If you are suspicious, but have not actually seen the deer snacking, footprints and droppings are a sure sign that they have been in your yard.  Also, typical signs of deer damage are plants with ripped or jagged edges leaves and tree bark with score marks.   An adult deer eats 6-10 pounds of greenery per day so you will need a definite plan to keep the deer out of the garden.  A fence is a sure way to keep them out, but costly and may take away from the natural beauty of your property.  Deer resistant plants can be planted around the plants that the deer are targeting. For example: plants with furred leaves or spines and that have a strong smell will be less appealing to them. Surround your garden with herbs with a strong scent which will mask the aroma of your annuals. Repellents are another way to deter deer. Because deer have such a keen sense of smell repellents can be very effective.  Just as the wonderful smell of your flower garden attracts, repellents can do the opposite with odoriferous ingredients.  Bobbex Deer Repellent is proven the most effective on the market and can be used year-round to protect against the deer.  So while you are planning your garden, plan on all natural, environmentally friendly Bobbex Deer and Animal Repellents. erogan Tonus Fortis Zevs Tonus Fortis Tonus Fortis Atlant Gel Zevs Penigen 500 BioBelt Testogen

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