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So: you either 1) love moles enough to leave them alone, in which case they’ll constantly dig up your yard/ruin your garden, or 2) you like your lawn/garden without mole tunnels and mounds MORE than you love moles, which means getting rid of the moles by either trapping/re-homing them (which, as I said, will kill them 99 times out of 100) or setting kill traps. You know about this, right? http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/pest-control/herbicide-damage-zmgz13fmzsto.aspx I’m daunted by the garden I’ve inherited I am sooo grateful for this post! I have had “bad luck” with my tomatos for the past 3 to 4 years, and I could not for the life of me figure out what I was doing wrong! Now I see that I had done the same as you had, adding manure (from my neighbors aged cow manure pile) to our garden. I used to grow beautiful tomatos, and beamed with pride at my quarts of lovely canned tomatos lined up on my shelf, waiting to be enjoyed in the midst of winter! I guess pride came before the fall! LOL! I have tried everything I could think of to try to deal with the problem, even moving all my tomatos to big pots on my porch, BUT I was still using soil from my garden! AhHa! My mom had a bumper crop of tomatos this year, using big pots on her porch, but the only soil she used was Miracle Gro Moisture Control soil, and I am going to do this next year! I don’t like having to buy soil when we have access to all the free manure to amend our soil, but, in light of this info, I think that we may have to, at least for our tomato plants. I have not noticed any of my other plants having the problems like the tomatos, so at least my garden will not be totally unusable next summer. Thank you so much for all the info!!! 🙂 Blessings, and Happy Fall! 🙂 The most important benefit of fungi, however, is their capacity to create crumb structure in your soil. This is the most desirable characteristic for garden soils. A soil with crumb structure can breathe freely while allowing ease of root growth and ideal water infiltration. Earthworms move unimpeded through these aggregates, as do beneficial nematodes and microarthropods. You can plunge your hands deep into this medium and it smells good enough to eat. Gardening is pure pleasure when you have achieved this holy grail of good soil management, but it is not possible without nurturing your fungal workforce. Life Force® Instant Humus™ involves super-concentrated soluble humic acid granules. Two teaspoons of these black crystals are added to a watering can full of water, and applied to 10 m2 of soil. You will almost hear your fungi rejoice! I am turning 70 in a few months and Hubs is 74. So it may be that we are more susceptible than you younger gardeners. But it turns out oak leaves harbor mites, and we have been bitten by them. I had a terrible time with what I thought was chiggers in the garden, worse than I could remember since we started gardening here in 2011. And now I have a rash on my leg I cannot get to go away. I’ve been researching and I think that one of two things have happened: 1) I am being bitten by oak mites and not chiggers, and they are triggering an allergy of some kind; and/or 2) I have gotten fungus on my hands from the wood chip pile, and then scratched my chigger (or mite, whichever) bites, thus allowing the fungus to get into my skin. Hubs has had a rash on one of his legs for about six months. We’ve shown our rashes to doctors and they say, “contact dermatitis”. Though the ointments they prescribe do not help. Hubs had an additional problem in that he was shoveling wood chips from the pile and got in a cloud of “dust” which must’ve been fungal in nature. All night that night, he hacked and coughed. Fortunately, those symptoms were gone by morning, and he has since had a chest xray as the normal part of a checkup and everything was ok. But it was kind of scary. We’ll be going back to the doctor and telling them what we think might be causing our rashes now, since doctors these days won’t waste their time doing any detective work and it’s just all too easy to lump every skin problem into “contact dermatitis” and send the patient away. The only problem is, we have to wait almost a month to get in to see the doctor. Sheesh. So much can happen in a month. So I’m trying to think about what I might try in the meantime. Maybe tea tree oil, neat? These articles have some garden design ideas for you. I am container gardening on my deck and my tomato plants are turning yellow. Really appreciate your sharing this with us! So good to know and be aware of…we do want natural soil and gardens. I’m sorry about your own! To be honest, this whole issue bothers me very, very deeply. Composted manure is cheap, it’s natural (most of the time), and is readily available. If we can no longer use it on our gardens, what then? The same goes for hay mulch… I can hardly stand the thought of being stripped of these options due to herbicides. I’m still ruminating on these thoughts… I’ll share more in an upcoming post. You might appreciate a post I wrote earlier this year on the herbicide problem with straw bale gardening: http://www.thesurvivalgardener.com/danger-of-straw-bale-gardening-no-one-is-mentioning/ I’ve visited Patrick’s community garden; it’s a nice little urban oasis. But that urban setting makes being realistic about potential vermin problems crucial. Its very easy to breed the nasty, dangerous things, and much harder to get the population to go in the other direction. So here are some ideas. On a garden or driveway Mulch is one of the unsung heroes of landscape design. It’s highly portable, malleable and, for certain types of mulch, you can even make your own! Areas shaded by large trees can be transformed overnight from eyesores to eye-openers by applying an attractive mulch. For all its value, there is much misunderstanding about the use of this landscaping solution, and I receive numerous questions about garden mulch from readers. There are as many types of landscaping mulch as there are landscape challenges. Mulch is sometimes used in conjunction with landscape fabrics. Will it take much looking after? Once planted, this garden will look after itself — aside from the odd pruning of climbers, such as clematis, and the addition of some bright summer blooms, like lilies or poppies. Be sure you are not overwatering–tomatoes that have been in the garden a few weeks can be watered every three or four days. Allow the first inch of soil to dry before watering again. Pale leaves may also be an indication of pest insects feeding on the leaves; check the undersides of leaves to be sure pest insects are not harboring there. I seem to have found a solution to deer. Just a bb or pellet gun. Mine do not come back. I hate stinging them, as I am the animal rescue type. But my whole lawn is a garden, and nothing was working. Did this as a child for my dad. A few years back, my own son (without my knowing) did that for me. This week our columnist Lydia Harvey shows us how easy it is to start a garden – even when you don’t have a lot of space. Here’s where all the answers are.  Well okay maybe not ALL the answers but if you’ve got a gardening problem then our Organic Problem Solver section is a good place to start.  Just select one of the sections to get started. el macho TestX Core Celuraid Muscle Celuraid Muscle BioBelt deseo Masculin Active Eron Plus power up premium deseo

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