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Salts applied to walkways and roads in winter may splash into garden; keep salty water off foliage. Flush soil with good water. Test soil for soluble salt level. The key to your small-space urban gardening success has a lot to do with the types of pots or planters you select. You wouldn’t want Roundup Ready alfalfa anyway if your trying to have a clean healthy garden. I remember reading somewhere that Roundup was found in lettuce sample a year after it was sprayed on a field. There may not be enough to harm the plants but why take the risk? https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/extension-search/ What animal it might be will depend on your location. It is likely not a mole, because of its diet. Voles (similar to mice) dig shallow tunnels that run along the lawn, as moles do; these rodents can be destructive in the garden. Other small rodents, such as mice might be a possibility as well. Chipmunks also dig tunnels, although you might not see the tunnels running along the surface. Gophers leave mounds of dirt at tunnel entrances, but not tunnels along the grass. Large holes could be a woodchuck, but they don’t have shallow tunnels. Rabbits, crows, raccoons, squirrels, coyotes, deer . . . just about any animal that eats fruit as part of its diet will take advantage of a melon. Raccoons like melons (and corn) especially. What animal it is will affect how you protect the fruit. Good luck! Deterrents fall into two categories: scent and sound. The problem with the latter is that we have a dog who will hate the high pitched emissions. That leaves finding things that moles don’t like the smell of and either sticking them into the tunnel or sprinkling them around the garden and watering them in. The key to your small-space urban gardening success has a lot to do with the types of pots or planters you select. Photo: Vegepod Grampa liked his plants so much that the next year he planted 5. How many stones do you think he will need to go around this garden? Print one integer number — the minimum number of hours required to water the garden. Most are problems gardeners experience almost anywhere, but some problems are more specific to our area. In our resource guide, we have followed an integrated pest management approach where simple, safe, and less invasive strategies are listed first. This is the same approach we use with visitors to our walk-in Plant Doctor service located in the Kemper Center for Home Gardening as well as with callers to our phone-in Horticultural Answer Service. Recommendations using chemical pesticides, though not excluded in an integrated pest management approach, generally appear lower down in the list of recommended strategies. Strictly organic strategies are pointed out. You can look up pest and problems by plant or pest category. Start small From windowsill herb planters, garden towers and even hanging baskets – these are ideal for an apartment window or a mini-balcony. It’s also the perfect place to start if you have limited outdoor space. My garden is an awkward shape The Kitchen Garden Grower’s Guide is a veritable encyclopaedia that provides simple guidance to the kitchen gardener and cook to bring fresh, inexpensive, and healthy food from your garden to your table. Image source: veggiegardeningtips.com 3. Your book features 57 gardening dilemmas and solutions for those dilemmas. How did you determine which dilemmas to include? Were they based on personal experience or did you survey a lot of gardeners to find the most common dilemmas? Is a follow-up book in the works with more gardening dilemmas? There are issues which come up again and again, like ‘My yard is too long and narrow’. I tend to write for people who are not horticultural experts but are design-aware (like me) and I see gardens on these terms. For a while I was gardening for a book publisher whose long, narrow garden was the length of a city block. It was difficult to rationalize the space. When I saw designer Chris Moss’s London garden, which is compartmentalized in a clever way, it stuck in my mind and was the first ‘problem’ to go into the book. A visual guide to easy diagnosis and practical remedies. This bestselling book has been fully updated to include the latest available practical remedies and solutions for your garden. Just had similar experience this year. Moved far, far away, bought a farm in a climate where people actually grow crops…not just grass hay. Inquired about the “free” compost pile at landfill then got schooled by local gardeners that some farmers spray “Grazon” (had NEVER heard of it!) and the likes and to be very wary about buying topsoil/compost from local sources. Was so excited to find big round bales of straw on my place left from past owner. Built amazing lasagne style gardens with this straw and also mulched top of most beds with it. Found out it was sprayed and did my best to get the mulch off but the lasagne beds were hopeless. Wow. I lost almost everything that had been planted in those beds and that was the only variable that was different. This house was purchased a year ago but found after a few months the grass didn’t look great. We notice that walking on the grass that there is a squelching sound pretty much all the time and try to keep off it. Garden is L shaped with a section going behind the detached garage. The garden is North facing too. To be honest, this whole issue bothers me very, very deeply. Composted manure is cheap, it’s natural (most of the time), and is readily available. If we can no longer use it on our gardens, what then? The same goes for hay mulch… I can hardly stand the thought of being stripped of these options due to herbicides. I’m still ruminating on these thoughts… I’ll share more in an upcoming post. Here is a quick troubleshooting guide to common gardening mistakes. I drew a picture of a garden and a sidewalk being built around the outside. The height of the inside (garden) was 17 ft and the width was 20 feet. Then, I made a 3-foot corner around all four corners of the garden. So, the height of the exterior was 17 + 3 + 3 = 23 feet, while the width was 3 + 3 + 20 = 26 feet. So, the perimeter of the inside is 74 feet and the perimeter of the outside is 98 feet. I added these two to get 172 feet as the total perimeter. Inexorably, I deemed that 172 feet of lumber was needed for the perimeter of the walk. Is that safe to assume or am I misinterpreting the question/what it is asking for? I am getting a bit « tripped up » of the fact that the problem gave me that, « to make the forms for the cement, we will need to buy some 2-by-4-inch lumber. » Really appreciate your sharing this with us! So good to know and be aware of…we do want natural soil and gardens. I’m sorry about your own! We have loads of tips and garden advice so you can find a solution to most common garden problems alongside practical solutions for sorting them out. My sympathies! I had similiar problems in 2008. At that time there was little information about persistent herbicides. After 30 years of careful organic gardening, I almost gave up gardening. Fortunately, my whole garden wasn’t involved! I no longer use manure. For the last 3 years I have used barley straw from a nearby farmer who doesn’t use persistent herbicides. Yes, barley comes up but it is easy to pull. http://www.thesurvivalgardener.com/more-victims-of-satanic-grazon-herbicide/ This year we will be launching a unique online garden design tutorial package at a fraction of the cost of any design fee.  We have created videos showing you how to survey your garden and how to use the simple basic principles of garden design. Together, we will design your very own outdoor living space which will lead you … up your own garden path! 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