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We luckily have a source that swears they assay each load of compost before they use in the 3- and 4-way garden soil mixes. We used them again this year when we remade the front yards raised beds. Everything we planted flourished. Protect your flower and vegetable gardens from pests and disease with organic… Well why not give small space gardening a go? Almost anything is suitable to grow in small spaces and here’s how you can do it. Our pest and problem pages contain information on over 200 of the most frequently encountered garden plant problems by the Plant Doctors at the William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening. Large front gardens: what’s the point? Hi, sounds like sparrowhawk and not local cats to blame then! I was upset thinking the cat had got it for no other reason than to play with it as they certainly aren’t hungry(unless they are feral cats) as you say its nature and sparrowhawk has to eat. i find it hard with cats as its not for food, its just for fun, know that’s how cats are and don’t like them because of it! They wreak havoc on the natural wildlife and poo in your garden to boot! 🙂 My garden is on a steep slope Dear Carol, We have a problem area which we are keen to see turned into a stylish courtyard. The site faces east and only receives the morning sun. The soil quality is reasonable but will require additional nutrients (the house was tenanted for 15 years – the last eight by non-gardeners). We thought of having a perfumed garden area, and we like hydrangeas and star jasmine as well as the sound of trickling water. failing garden featured garden gardening Plants vegetables If you’ve never grown anything before, start small with just a few plants, herbs or flowers. Once you’ve successfully grown and harvested a few foods you will gain confidence and be ready to expand your indoor garden. And while I’ve listed some of the easier plants to start with don’t be afraid to experiment, I’ve had readers successfully grow potatoes in their apartment. but the metals get into our water supply so now we need filters to water the garden… not sure how to do that yet. On a garden or driveway My lawn guy was giving me grass clippings from my yard as well as the neighbors – but I stopped doing that because I think the neighbor had their yard sprayed with a weed killer of some kind and it got into my compost. I think my garden that season was poisoned by the compost. Now I just use clippings from my own yard because I know they’re not sprayed with anything. Books are great sources of gardening information! We love to help gardeners here at Gardening Know How, we are a great source of information and love to help with all your garden questions! Every garden deserves a citrus tree. In all but the coldest districts, citrus trees feature in backyards. Hi am66 sorry you found the bird remains in your garden, but the feathers do suggest it could have been a Sparrowhawk.  I know how you feel as I have a cat problem too and have lost birds to them.  My favourite solution is to spray them with water, but that only works when I’m there.  You could try Hazel’s suggestions, but I wouldn’t advise you stop feeding.  If you have feeders on the ground make sure birds have a clear view all round and there’s nowhere a cat can spring out unseen.  Good luck. You know about this, right? http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/pest-control/herbicide-damage-zmgz13fmzsto.aspx Q. Mike: I’m hoping you can help kick-start a new program at our community garden. Historically, we’ve had one large cold compost heap that was an unmanaged eyesore. The « compost committee » has chosen to move in a new direction and have the individual gardeners create and manage their own composting. Some gardeners are planning to group together and build large 3-bin systems; others just want a small pile for their own 10 x 10 plot. Either way, we’re urging them to learn ‘hot composting’ techniques, as I know that compost that heats up quickly is far superior to the cold kind, and takes much less time to finish. Any advice to get us started on the right track? IDC’s ‘Three Platforms’ definition30 (first: mainframe, second: client/server, third: mobile/social) gives us some insight into just how important any ethical obligations in the walled-garden ecosystems will be over time – each platform is typified by orders of magnitude more applications that might be used by consumers, thus increasing the number of potential vectors from which users might be adversely impacted. As such, it will likely require ongoing vigilance from users and independent security/data protection groups, as well as the likes of Apple and Google in order to limit user exposure to fraud, and this is an area that will undoubtedly receive increasing attention as smartphones and other highly portable computing devices grow in use, particularly where such use supplants older generation services. Stewart brought her gardening talents to the concrete jungle back in 2008. That’s when she made an agreement with management at the Westport post office to plan a community garden in front of the facility. I am turning 70 in a few months and Hubs is 74. So it may be that we are more susceptible than you younger gardeners. But it turns out oak leaves harbor mites, and we have been bitten by them. I had a terrible time with what I thought was chiggers in the garden, worse than I could remember since we started gardening here in 2011. And now I have a rash on my leg I cannot get to go away. I’ve been researching and I think that one of two things have happened: 1) I am being bitten by oak mites and not chiggers, and they are triggering an allergy of some kind; and/or 2) I have gotten fungus on my hands from the wood chip pile, and then scratched my chigger (or mite, whichever) bites, thus allowing the fungus to get into my skin. Hubs has had a rash on one of his legs for about six months. We’ve shown our rashes to doctors and they say, “contact dermatitis”. Though the ointments they prescribe do not help. Hubs had an additional problem in that he was shoveling wood chips from the pile and got in a cloud of “dust” which must’ve been fungal in nature. All night that night, he hacked and coughed. Fortunately, those symptoms were gone by morning, and he has since had a chest xray as the normal part of a checkup and everything was ok. But it was kind of scary. We’ll be going back to the doctor and telling them what we think might be causing our rashes now, since doctors these days won’t waste their time doing any detective work and it’s just all too easy to lump every skin problem into “contact dermatitis” and send the patient away. The only problem is, we have to wait almost a month to get in to see the doctor. Sheesh. So much can happen in a month. So I’m trying to think about what I might try in the meantime. Maybe tea tree oil, neat? I have had very good luck with my compost and mulch(alfalfa rotted hay). I started out building my beds by sheet mulching the area. Cardboard, Agricultural molasses, compost, more molasses based fertilizer with mushroom extracts, more compost and then a heavy layer of rotted hay. Five seasons in, Now i use a cover crop and chop and drop all season. clover is great at fixing nitrogen and i find it in areas the soil needs repair, it goes away as the soil enriches. You might consider putting down a good molasses based fertilizer( i get mine in bulk 55 gal drums) and planting in a cover crop to your damaged areas Let that brew all winter and see if it helps. I am finding minerals are huge in soil health. My climate and soil is similar to yours, we are high prairie desert with wind and heat extremes. I have been fortunate to have a very robust garden this season with minimal to almost no watering. Erozon Max BioBelt Tonus Fortis Erozon Max Testogen machoman Maxman testogen TestX Core Celuraid Muscle

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