remember karotte lost

We’re in a new build house and are now outside of our warranty (by over 12 months). The garden has been an issue since we moved in (2012) specifically with drainage. Whilst in the warranty, we had the drainage re done and this was eventually completed in spring 2015 (outside warranty but delayed on new build company’s part due to waiting for warmer weather and deadlines on the new houses on the estate). Fast forward a year, the garden still doesn’t drain properly. We’ve got in a professional to give us a quote on sorting it and was willing to pay ourselves to get it sorted. It’s come back at £7k to fix and landscape it better than what it’s been done when we first moved in. Landscaper is suggesting that the soil is the problem and the drainage not being right. I was willing to pay a bit to sort it but now I’m annoyed that we’ve paid all this money for a house and basically haven’t got what we want; what’s worse, we need to pay around £7k to fix without adding any value. Have we got a legal case to take this back to the new build company? I hear from neighbours that they’ve got similar problems with drainage and gardens being ruined, but not sure if we individually have a case, or if we have a collective claim as it seems that when they’ve developed the site, they’ve not accounted for the fact they’re building into a hill. The drainage is shocking. I’m pissed off as this was our « dream home » and for 3 years we haven’t had a proper garden. Any recommendations of solicitors who deal with this kind of thing would be very welcome. Rock the pots You’ve successfully kept a small pot of herbs alive and feel like you can expand out. To do this, buy a large garden pot and fill it with soil, add seedlings and water regularly. This works well for silverbeet, strawberries even tomatoes and chillies. Also check out miniature fruit trees which thrive in pots. In Sam and Jill’s garden there are two sorts of ladybirds. There are red Seven-Spot ladybirds with $7$ black spots and shiny black Four-Spot ladybirds with $4$ red spots. Well why not give small space gardening a go? Almost anything is suitable to grow in small spaces and here’s how you can do it. Hi Hazel, thank you for that. Have never had nest box as neither me or partner great at DIY. My garden is very wildlife friendly as in a lot of it is untouched! I have 2 large hedges, laurel in front & I don’t know what the other one is usual hedging plant(box?), but it is a bit of a monster now, probably 15ft, neighbour has asked if he could cut it to 8ft which is fine as long as he does it soon before nesting starts. 🙂 Thanks for the follow up. Sounds like the plants are on the right track. Happy gardening! 3. Your book features 57 gardening dilemmas and solutions for those dilemmas. How did you determine which dilemmas to include? Were they based on personal experience or did you survey a lot of gardeners to find the most common dilemmas? Is a follow-up book in the works with more gardening dilemmas? There are issues which come up again and again, like ‘My yard is too long and narrow’. I tend to write for people who are not horticultural experts but are design-aware (like me) and I see gardens on these terms. For a while I was gardening for a book publisher whose long, narrow garden was the length of a city block. It was difficult to rationalize the space. When I saw designer Chris Moss’s London garden, which is compartmentalized in a clever way, it stuck in my mind and was the first ‘problem’ to go into the book. Everything looked fine when I first put them in the garden. I planted my tomatoes (Amish Paste) in a new spot this year– normally they are along my fence, but this year, I had more plants so I stuck them in the area I usually plant my onions. I mulched them and watered them, and sat back to watch them grow. The critical points occur when $\dfrac{dC}{dx} = 0$: \[ \begin{align*} \dfrac{dC}{dx} = 0 &= -\dfrac{600}{x^2} + 2 \\[8px] -2 &= -\dfrac{600}{x^2} \\[8px] x^2 &= \dfrac{600}{2} \\[8px] &= 300 \\[8px] x &= \sqrt{300} \end{align*} \] Note that we choose the positive square root since the width x cannot be negative. Also note that we could have a critical point where $\dfrac{dC}{dx} = -\dfrac{600}{x^2} + 2$ is undefined, which occurs when $x=0$. That answer makes no physical sense, though, since then Sam’s garden would have zero area. We thus continue our analysis with the single critical point $$x = \sqrt{300}$$ Oh my gosh I’m so sorry this happened to you! How discouraging. I hope you are able to enjoy at least some produce from your small garden by your house. And I certainly hope next year is much, much better! so what about the garden that won’t ‘develope ‘ root crops?? Dudeni, if it’s thick clay and north facing, I’d consider going grass less. You’ll never get a good lawn with those conditions. You’ll be permanently fighting moss and bad drainage. Your problem isn’t easily rectified and lack of sun is something you can’t solve. I’d seriously consider a different style of garden. In a Winters walnut orchard, Glassman designed a resort-like pool and patio combination. The mosaics of a Land Park artist became part of her garden makeover. A boring, tired, lawn-heavy Davis landscape transformed into an inspirational zen garden. If you are currently deep-mulching and having great results, you don’t really have anything to worry about, although I wouldn’t recommend adding any more hay to your garden until you are sure of its history. I have people emailing me CONSTANTLY with glowing reports of their deep hay mulch, and I’ve had beautiful results as well, so I don’t think *all* hay is a problem, and if you can verify your hay/straw is clean, I would absolutely still use it. Just had similar experience this year. Moved far, far away, bought a farm in a climate where people actually grow crops…not just grass hay. Inquired about the “free” compost pile at landfill then got schooled by local gardeners that some farmers spray “Grazon” (had NEVER heard of it!) and the likes and to be very wary about buying topsoil/compost from local sources. Was so excited to find big round bales of straw on my place left from past owner. Built amazing lasagne style gardens with this straw and also mulched top of most beds with it. Found out it was sprayed and did my best to get the mulch off but the lasagne beds were hopeless. Wow. I lost almost everything that had been planted in those beds and that was the only variable that was different. Large front gardens: what’s the point? Will chickens destroy my garden? So how can you keep rodents out the garden, and from potentially entering your home?  A garden is one of the most important aspects of a self-reliant lifestyle. They provide a means of growing your own food and gardening itself is a very rewarding activity. However, some people aren’t blessed with a green thumb and can find themselves struggling to keep their plants alive. Well Doctor, we’ve always said that part of the fun of gardening, is learning new things. The first step is to diagnose plant problems. Put on your investigator’s cap, examine the symptoms, identify the causes, administer the cure (most are quite simple), and learn some new « stuff ». Do you have access to wood chips? We do deep wood chips the same way you use hay and it works great in our area. We have access to free chips easily though. You can’t mix them in the soil and you plant below them. They turn into compost and build up the top soil over time. We add fresh chips 2 times a year to the top. Sorry about the garden! deseo Penigen 500 VigRX Plus BioBelt Testogen eracto Penigen 500 BioBelt power up premium power up premium

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