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The calendar says it is January, but gardening enthusiasts have already begun planning for spring.  Seeds are being ordered, grow lights are being tested and garden centers will have a run on grow pots. Every gardener wants to improve upon last year’s results. Many will try to new strategies to protect against the pest that drove them crazy the previous year.  A big pest is the deer that come to browse in your yard. These beautiful creatures have now become a nuisance and your hard work and planning will have been in vain! If you are suspicious, but have not actually seen the deer snacking, footprints and droppings are a sure sign that they have been in your yard.  Also, typical signs of deer damage are plants with ripped or jagged edges leaves and tree bark with score marks.   An adult deer eats 6-10 pounds of greenery per day so you will need a definite plan to keep the deer out of the garden.  A fence is a sure way to keep them out, but costly and may take away from the natural beauty of your property.  Deer resistant plants can be planted around the plants that the deer are targeting. For example: plants with furred leaves or spines and that have a strong smell will be less appealing to them. Surround your garden with herbs with a strong scent which will mask the aroma of your annuals. Repellents are another way to deter deer. Because deer have such a keen sense of smell repellents can be very effective.  Just as the wonderful smell of your flower garden attracts, repellents can do the opposite with odoriferous ingredients.  Bobbex Deer Repellent is proven the most effective on the market and can be used year-round to protect against the deer.  So while you are planning your garden, plan on all natural, environmentally friendly Bobbex Deer and Animal Repellents. This can be very frustrating! We have articles on Gardening Know How that will help address some of the common garden pests and even uncommon ones! My garden is not relaxing I’m sad you’ve had such trouble with your garden this year. I want to suggest you research the use of chemtrails in your area. These are easy to see in the sky when they’re being dropped from airplanes. We created a clear plastic roof over our garden to avoid their harmful chemicals. I believe it helped us with our first garden this year. Chemtrails are happening all over the world and have been for quite awhile. You can search “chemtrails” on the web. It is also called Geo-Engineering. Aminopyralids take 3-7 years to break down. The fastest way to remediate the problem is to remove as much as possible of the contaminated organic material. Contact with soil microbes is necessary to get the aminopyralid to biodegrade. So keeping the soil moist and turning it often so the offending organic matter is always in contact with soil microbes so that it breaks down as quickly as possible. Composting won’t break down aminopyralids. It has to be soil. Also you could try to grow something like lettuce to see if your whole garden is contaminated or just a small area. Any plant affected with aminopyralid will contaminate any soil it comes into contact with. Aminopyralids pass through animals unchanged so the manure is also unusable. Laura is the Community Kitchen Garden Horticulturist at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. When she’s not working in vegetable garden, she enjoys spending her days at the river and checking out all of the new restaurants the Richmond food scene has to offer. The calendar says it is January, but gardening enthusiasts have already begun planning for spring.  Seeds are being ordered, grow lights are being tested and garden centers will have a run on grow pots. Every gardener wants to improve upon last year’s results. Many will try to new strategies to protect against the pest that drove them crazy the previous year.  A big pest is the deer that come to browse in your yard. These beautiful creatures have now become a nuisance and your hard work and planning will have been in vain! If you are suspicious, but have not actually seen the deer snacking, footprints and droppings are a sure sign that they have been in your yard.  Also, typical signs of deer damage are plants with ripped or jagged edges leaves and tree bark with score marks.   An adult deer eats 6-10 pounds of greenery per day so you will need a definite plan to keep the deer out of the garden.  A fence is a sure way to keep them out, but costly and may take away from the natural beauty of your property.  Deer resistant plants can be planted around the plants that the deer are targeting. For example: plants with furred leaves or spines and that have a strong smell will be less appealing to them. Surround your garden with herbs with a strong scent which will mask the aroma of your annuals. Repellents are another way to deter deer. Because deer have such a keen sense of smell repellents can be very effective.  Just as the wonderful smell of your flower garden attracts, repellents can do the opposite with odoriferous ingredients.  Bobbex Deer Repellent is proven the most effective on the market and can be used year-round to protect against the deer.  So while you are planning your garden, plan on all natural, environmentally friendly Bobbex Deer and Animal Repellents. Wow, thank you for sharing your experience! Our garden was a flop this year, which is a real bummer. However, take this break has renewed our zeal for next year, and I’m already looking forward to some fresh delicious produce next year. My garden is too small My wife’s family grows alfalfa and I have been using hay from their barn floors for the last few years to deep mulch my garden. Been loving it and my garden grows great……….however…..I have been worried about this issue as they recently planted a field of “Round Up Ready Alfalfa.” You can no longer assume that alfalfa isn’t sprayed with herbicides. They have been using grass killers in alfalfa fields for years. Most garden plants aren’t grasses so maybe that’s why it’s been a bit of a non issue……but the effect of round up residues may potentially bring about different concerns. Thanks for sharing Jill. I’ll be keeping a close eye on things as I have been hoping this wouldn’t be an issue. I guess we were lucky and were only out about $800 in death dirt and dead plants. Local organic gardens lost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Thanks Dow. Thanks Monsanto. When a problem is seen as insurmountable, it can stop people from doing anything, especially when added to worries about keeping plants alive. I’ve avoided being too technical and have emphasised an approach which is not time-consuming, or complicated. This is the kind of gardening that appeals to me. What is the problem with your garden? Laura is the Community Kitchen Garden Horticulturist at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. When she’s not working in vegetable garden, she enjoys spending her days at the river and checking out all of the new restaurants the Richmond food scene has to offer. Hi Jill, If you’re going to do raised beds, look into square foot gardening if you haven’t already. The author Mel Bartholomew has a blend that he uses for soil that drains well, but still retains moisture. It’s what I want to do next year. Pests and problems come up in any garden setting. To have the best garden you can have you must go on the offensive to treat garden pest problems in your landscape. Find tips to peacefully coexist with dogs, pests, and prevent any of your garden problems! Maca peruana power up premium Testogen Testo Ultra Eron Plus el macho Erozon Max VigRX VigRX Plus deseo

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