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You might appreciate a post I wrote earlier this year on the herbicide problem with straw bale gardening: http://www.thesurvivalgardener.com/danger-of-straw-bale-gardening-no-one-is-mentioning/ “We want this book to be a go-to resource rather than just sit on a coffee table and look pretty,” Ballinger said. “If you’ve never had a garden, we want you to start at the beginning and leisurely understand all the steps.” I have had a similar problem in my garden. I started a small area as a deep mulch bed, and NOTHING would sprout. Thinking that it was the chickens (they have only this year been let into the garden to free rang and have been eating any sprouts they can get there beaks on), I started some seeds and transplanted them. They grew for a few days, then just died. It was very strange. I hope its not this! I don’t like gardening in the cold I had a similar problem this year…new garden…new wood mulch…some things did great, tomatoes failed. I did research and it says wood and straw mulch can do good at first but they PULL THE NITROGEN out of the soil so the plants can fail. I believe that’s what happened. My research said compost OR leaf mulch is actually the best for your garden. Sometimes there will be problems in the vegetable garden. There is always a cause and there is often a cure or control. 5. What gardening dilemma are you facing at the moment in your garden? My own garden has at least a dozen dilemmas, mainly to do with living in a cottage. The neighbors are very close but once you walk down toward the field that we back on to (where lambs are hopping about right now), then it is completely private. Though rather far from the house. Since writing the book I am changing my garden completely, after 12 years of indecision. I now have the confidence, and trust my ideas. My garden collapses after June There is nothing to look at in winter So you won’t see images of beautiful (& hugely expensive) manicured gardens because most of us won’t have a garden that looks like that. You will however find lots of sensible, practical and useful advice on how to get things right yourself. The problem with my garden is that I’m getting a new home and it doesn’t exist yet. Expert know-how on solving gardening problems & more Got questions about this article or any other garden topic? Go here now to post your gardening ideas, questions, kudos or complaints. We have gardening experts standing by to help you! Good luck, hope Brian helps protect your back garden so you can continue enjoying the birdlife . In her latest book, The Problem with My Garden, she offers savvy solutions, insightful advice and inspiration for dealing with specific gardening problems. Read on to learn more about this Laurence King Publishing book and enter to win one of 3 copies! Question 3 is something that I’m starting to see as the bridge between “Length 12” and “Length x” from the original problem statement.  If you can do it with 1000, then you can do it with x.  Question 6 was also nice because some students used their formula to show that the garden length would not be a whole number if it used 2011 tiles, while other students made the reasonable observation that every garden tile number is even. Many gardens are overrun with the slow-moving creatures. There are many different problems that you can be faced with in your garden so feel free to get in touch with us to discuss how we can help you with yours.  « The $10 billion-a-year U.S. horticulture industry is based on cheap oil and cheap plastics, » writes Beth Botts in the Chicago Tribune. Botts has won awards for her eloquent writing on the problems of garden plastics. Chief among them is the lack of standards for materials, colors or sizes of pots and other garden plastics. Often the materials used are not even identified — making them devilishly hard to recycle. And the industry shies away from reuse because of the risks of spreading plant disease. Not sure what the problem is? Or stuck on how to solve it? Get in touch with our friendly gardening experts today who will be happy to point you in the right direction. Rake out thatch in September or early spring with a garden rake or scarifier. To prevent it coming back, collect the grass clippings if your mower has a grass box, or rake up all clippings after each mowing. I container gardening last year adding some more this spring. I would love to have a vegetable/fruit garden in the yard, however, due a neighbor’s tree I only have a large root and hard, dry compacted dirt. I’m Ohio, with extremely unpredictable weather. ANY input is welcome on how to start this garden and the soil prep. Sign up to receive our eco newsletter full of great organic gardening tips plus product updates and offers. In 2010 my husband built raised beds that outline our residential side and back yards. We bought three way mix from a local nursery. We spent several hundred dollars having two dump trucks full of gardening three-way mix delivered and spent a month shoveling. We planted starts and seeds. The veggie starts, including several types squash, beans, green beans, cukes and tomatoes. They all died. I planted seeds that never came up. Replanted with starts, they died. I had an all over failure. Then we find out our county made national news for crop failures due to Aminopyralid poisoned manuer that passed unprocessed through our huge local dairy cow population (Whatcom County, WA). Solution: Many gardeners would not consider shade a problem as there are dozens upon dozens of shade-loving plants. Fill a shady landscape with hosta, hellebores, bleeding hearts, hollies, azaleas, boxwood, ferns, ginger, English ivy, hydrangea and ajuga. I’d like an elegant vegetable garden The calendar says it is January, but gardening enthusiasts have already begun planning for spring.  Seeds are being ordered, grow lights are being tested and garden centers will have a run on grow pots. Every gardener wants to improve upon last year’s results. Many will try to new strategies to protect against the pest that drove them crazy the previous year.  A big pest is the deer that come to browse in your yard. These beautiful creatures have now become a nuisance and your hard work and planning will have been in vain! If you are suspicious, but have not actually seen the deer snacking, footprints and droppings are a sure sign that they have been in your yard.  Also, typical signs of deer damage are plants with ripped or jagged edges leaves and tree bark with score marks.   An adult deer eats 6-10 pounds of greenery per day so you will need a definite plan to keep the deer out of the garden.  A fence is a sure way to keep them out, but costly and may take away from the natural beauty of your property.  Deer resistant plants can be planted around the plants that the deer are targeting. For example: plants with furred leaves or spines and that have a strong smell will be less appealing to them. Surround your garden with herbs with a strong scent which will mask the aroma of your annuals. Repellents are another way to deter deer. Because deer have such a keen sense of smell repellents can be very effective.  Just as the wonderful smell of your flower garden attracts, repellents can do the opposite with odoriferous ingredients.  Bobbex Deer Repellent is proven the most effective on the market and can be used year-round to protect against the deer.  So while you are planning your garden, plan on all natural, environmentally friendly Bobbex Deer and Animal Repellents. Masculin Active BioBelt Testo Ultra machoman Maxman power up premium Maxman Testogen Zevs Erozon Max

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