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My problem that I haven’t figured out yet is this: I planted my garden 6 weeks ago. I put out corn, purple hull peas, bush beans, potatoes, tomatoes, sunflowers, squash, cucumbers, and beet. Approximately 1/3 of everything is coming up. I see these little trails of semi-broken ground that appear to follow my rows and then skip to the next. I thought moles at first but the tunnels seem too narrow being about 1/2″ I have dug at the ends or beginnings of these trails and turn up nothing. I even replanted in the vacant areas only to have the same problem. Does anyone have any suggestions. My garden is like a child’s tea set I had an experience this year with my mulch garden. I used a sprinkler with our well water (artesian water with high pH) and watered during a hot day (95+) temps. We usually use a soaker hose or rainwater, but tried the sprinkler this year. It totally burned the tomato, potato, and melon leaves. The rest of the garden didn’t look that great either. Another lesson learned after over 30 years of gardening. My garden is like a child’s tea set I seem to have found a solution to deer. Just a bb or pellet gun. Mine do not come back. I hate stinging them, as I am the animal rescue type. But my whole lawn is a garden, and nothing was working. Did this as a child for my dad. A few years back, my own son (without my knowing) did that for me. This can be very frustrating! We have articles on Gardening Know How that will help address some of the common garden pests and even uncommon ones! This house was purchased a year ago but found after a few months the grass didn’t look great. We notice that walking on the grass that there is a squelching sound pretty much all the time and try to keep off it. Garden is L shaped with a section going behind the detached garage. The garden is North facing too. Hi Jill, I’m so sorry about your garden. I’m a hydroponic/ soil gardener, but I’m 100% organic so I haven’t had that issue. Chalk it up to being hyper-attentive to what goes into our garden, courtesy of extreme food allergies and sensitivities. Something you might want to look into as a way to put nutrients back in your soil (in the event you can’t find organic fertilizers) is rotating your crops and beds. Alfalfa and soy are often used as a reconditioning crop every 3rd year, as they are very rich in nitrogen and other nutrients. You may want to consider having a few different planting areas and while two have crops, the third has alfalfa or soy. At the end of the season, till it in and let it compost over the winter. It was the old way of controlling weeds and restoring nutrients before herbicides and liquid fertilizers took over the mainstream. Container gardening I have used non-organic hay in the garden that I know was sprayed with broadleaf herbicides for 10 years and never had a problem with my plants. Maybe the concentrations weren’t high enough. But, 3 years ago, a neighbor up the valley from us sprayed his fields with 2,4-D and within a week my 150 tomato plants looked just like yours do. I didn’t connect it until the next year when another neighbor sprayed his fields with 2,4-D and I lost my tomato plants again and all of my lettuce that was just starting to head, bolted. I started talking to people and doing research and apparently, certain types of 2,4-D can really drift given the correct conditions. It affects plants drastically just by drift. Maybe you should look into the possibility that a neighbor sprayed something like 2,4-D on fields or lawns. Once it affects the plants, thats it for those plants. I let mine grow but they put on little to no flowers or fruit. This year, I planted in the same spot and didn’t remove the plant residue last fall. I waited until a week after the neighbor did his spraying and then transplanted my plants. Bingo, I had no trouble with my plants and they put on a good crop for us. So, it doesn’t seem to linger in the soil, at least for us. We have loads of tips and garden advice so you can find a solution to most common garden problems alongside practical solutions for sorting them out. failing garden featured garden gardening Plants vegetables I don’t like gardening in the cold “(A major step is) developing a master plan that you can follow all at once or slowly as you can afford to tackle all parts of your yard,” she added. “This is so important so the look is cohesive, and you don’t have to go back and rip up a vegetable garden when you realize that was the spot for your terrace.” “We featured 29 other designers from all over the United States plus Australia,” he said. “These are problem-solving solutions with a universal appeal. In Chicago, how do you relate to a California garden – or the drought? We have gardens in New Jersey, New York, Texas. No matter where they are, they have something they can relate to.” failing garden featured garden gardening Plants vegetables Trying new plants and designs in your garden is wonderful! But what if you want to live a healthier lifestyle and grow your own food? What if you’re time poor or you don’t have the space to maintain a large garden to grow your own food? Don’t let weeds rob your garden of its beauty. Use our guide to help you… 2. At the beginning of your book you state that “fear of gardening is quite common, strange though it might sound.” How does your book help us to allay that fear? The idea was to show a successful picture next to each dilemma, to help readers see that nothing is hopeless. A great garden is sometimes defined by a characteristic that has been embraced, instead of being despaired over. My friend’s excessively rocky garden is a garden with one main idea: rock. Yet it is tranquil, shaded in places and has pockets of deep rich earth which have been taken full advantage of. Other ideas for avoiding or minimizing plastic in the garden? Please share! My lawn guy was giving me grass clippings from my yard as well as the neighbors – but I stopped doing that because I think the neighbor had their yard sprayed with a weed killer of some kind and it got into my compost. I think my garden that season was poisoned by the compost. Now I just use clippings from my own yard because I know they’re not sprayed with anything. I use woodchips too, Paul Gautschi gardening method, but I experienced much of what Jill and others have (so thank you Jill for blogging your experience). In retrospect, I need to add more chips during the year like you do, because they do compost during winter-spring so that by summer, there’s no longer at least 4″ of chips, such that the soil below got very dry still especially during our prolonged hot spell in PA. The very bad news is the chemtrails above in our skies, containing metals like aluminum which stunts plant growth. The metals rain down and pollute. Now Paul thinks the chips filter out pollutants, so I may add much more than 4″ next year. Still, the soil takes time to build up healthiness with this method. In 2010 my husband built raised beds that outline our residential side and back yards. We bought three way mix from a local nursery. We spent several hundred dollars having two dump trucks full of gardening three-way mix delivered and spent a month shoveling. We planted starts and seeds. The veggie starts, including several types squash, beans, green beans, cukes and tomatoes. They all died. I planted seeds that never came up. Replanted with starts, they died. I had an all over failure. Then we find out our county made national news for crop failures due to Aminopyralid poisoned manuer that passed unprocessed through our huge local dairy cow population (Whatcom County, WA). 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