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The next phase of the lesson encouraged exploring different size gardens – first 6 plants … then 10 … then 20. Lots of work with materials and lots of recording. Some children gave up modelling and began drawing, especially when the number of plants got bigger. Hi Hazel, thank you for that. Have never had nest box as neither me or partner great at DIY. My garden is very wildlife friendly as in a lot of it is untouched! I have 2 large hedges, laurel in front & I don’t know what the other one is usual hedging plant(box?), but it is a bit of a monster now, probably 15ft, neighbour has asked if he could cut it to 8ft which is fine as long as he does it soon before nesting starts. 🙂 I drew a picture of a garden and a sidewalk being built around the outside. The height of the inside (garden) was 17 ft and the width was 20 feet. Then, I made a 3-foot corner around all four corners of the garden. So, the height of the exterior was 17 + 3 + 3 = 23 feet, while the width was 3 + 3 + 20 = 26 feet. So, the perimeter of the inside is 74 feet and the perimeter of the outside is 98 feet. I added these two to get 172 feet as the total perimeter. Inexorably, I deemed that 172 feet of lumber was needed for the perimeter of the walk. Is that safe to assume or am I misinterpreting the question/what it is asking for? I am getting a bit « tripped up » of the fact that the problem gave me that, « to make the forms for the cement, we will need to buy some 2-by-4-inch lumber. » There will, however, be others that do not share the same enthusiasm when it comes to gardening, and will simply give their gardens a ‘once over’ with the lawn mower every few weeks. Then there will be the Problem Neighbours who see their gardens as an excuse to use it as a makeshift area in which to store excess rubbish. Dear Real Living: I read with significant consternation the Friday, Jan. 17, article headlined « Prevent a garden slugfest with baits, maintenance. » Perhaps my having attended Pentacle Theatre’s production of « Dr. Doolittle » inspired me to point out a gross injustice. The article itself was fine, but the accompanying photo clearly pictured a Pacific banana slug (Ariolimax columbianus). This species, by far the largest and most obvious slug in our parts, is NOT a garden pest. These critters feed on detritus and dead plant material, not on living vegetation. As such, they actually help clean up our yards, not exfoliate them. Unfortunately, the SJ article will most certainly encourage people not aware of these slugs’ good intentions to dispatch them at every opportunity. Bad for the garden, truly tragic for the banana slugs. — Alex Bourdeau, West Salem When your plants are growing well, gardening is a breeze! When plant care problems arise in the rose garden, the herb garden, or the pumpkin patch, gardening can get a little frustrating. Suddenly you find yourself in the role of Plant Doctor, without any formal education in the field of diagnosing and healing sick plants. When your plants are growing well, gardening is a breeze! When plant care problems arise in the rose garden, the herb garden, or the pumpkin patch, gardening can get a little frustrating. Suddenly you find yourself in the role of Plant Doctor, without any formal education in the field of diagnosing and healing sick plants. Alternatively, creating a soakaway may be the answer. This requires a large hole at the lowest point of the garden and filled with rubble or broken bricks, and then covered with 300mm of soil. The soakaway will need to be quite large to have the desired effect – up to 1.8m (6 ft.) deep and the same across. There is not always a need for underground pipes to a soakaway although on land that has insufficient gradient to drain into a soakaway naturally, underground drain pipes of some sort will be required. Both clay and plastic pipes are available – the latter being easier to use and lighter to handle. Garden Gift Hub is one of the most thoughtful and interesting places on the web to find original and useful gardening and nature inspired products. Does anyone have experience using chemical-free grass clippings as mulch in the garden? Good idea or not so much? For those who want to avoid putting traps out around the garden, pest control company Ehrlich has four tips for steering rats away.  Our new home has similar garden lawn issues. If you can afford it employ prolawn. I’m daunted by the garden I’ve inherited The problem with my garden is that I’m getting a new home and it doesn’t exist yet. Solution: There are a few different options to help hold back soil such as rock gardens, retaining walls, erosion fabric or even terracing. The easiest option is to grow a deep-rooting ground cover such as pachysandra (shade) or creeping rosemary (sun). Hello am66,     Is there any way you can find a space in your back garden for the feeders, I assume that is fenced off for your greyhound as he would be a good deterrent to the cats.  I’m sorry you found feathers and remains of a bird but it is possible a Sparrowhawk could have predated the bird and not a cat as I think cats tend to take their prey away/ home and in tact.     There is an ultrasonic device that seems to get good reviews on Amazon website  HERE   and I know a fellow member on here (  Monkeycheese ) has just purchased two of them so maybe when he has had chance to test them out he can advise you how well they work.    Good luck, hope the cats get the message to stay out of your garden so you can continue to enjoy the visiting birds.    Therefore in order to establish if there is an ethical obligation for the curtailment of fraudulent activity we will have to look elsewhere for inspiration. In this, we might turn our attention to the notion of trust, and a comparison to a different form of market – the pawnbroker. First, in establishing their ‘walled garden’ application marketplaces, Apple and Google have at least implicitly created a statement of trust between themselves and the consumer: content is curated and verified, therefore it should, to a degree, be deemed trustworthy. Remedies: Some garden beds don’t need to be fertilized but rather have their PH levels checked and have compost added. Use a natural and organic fertilizer whenever possible. Kendra Wilson trained as a gardener at Cottesbrooke Hall in Northamptonshire, before joining Gardenista when it launched five years ago. Besides The Problem with My Garden, she has co-written The Book of the Dog for Laurence King, as well as The Book of the Bird. Before moving to the country, she lived in central London and was a designer and picture editor, starting at Vogue and ending at the Observer. Now a very good thing is happening in 2017. Kendra has written a new book, The Problem with My Garden, which offers succinct and sensible solutions to nearly 60 common dilemmas gardeners face. In each chapter, from “My yard has no privacy” to “My garden is windy,” she dispatches with wit such seemingly intractable obstacles as steep slopes, slugs, too much paving, too many trees, and an aversion to orange flowers. Dear Real Living: I read with significant consternation the Friday, Jan. 17, article headlined « Prevent a garden slugfest with baits, maintenance. » Perhaps my having attended Pentacle Theatre’s production of « Dr. Doolittle » inspired me to point out a gross injustice. The article itself was fine, but the accompanying photo clearly pictured a Pacific banana slug (Ariolimax columbianus). This species, by far the largest and most obvious slug in our parts, is NOT a garden pest. These critters feed on detritus and dead plant material, not on living vegetation. As such, they actually help clean up our yards, not exfoliate them. Unfortunately, the SJ article will most certainly encourage people not aware of these slugs’ good intentions to dispatch them at every opportunity. Bad for the garden, truly tragic for the banana slugs. — Alex Bourdeau, West Salem deseo Maxman erozon max eracto Atlant Gel Erozon Max el macho xtrasize Tonus Fortis Eron Plus

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