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Large front gardens: what’s the point? While I was away from my house for a year, no one tended to my garden. I came back and the weeds were 10′ tall! They had also taken root in the brick walkways and caused a lot of upheal of blocks. Now, no matter how many weeds I pull, more keep coming back. And the roots of some are so huge and can’t even be dug pu without disturbing so many bricks and the raised garden beds. What can I do, short of ripping everything out sand starting all over? Our pest and problem pages contain information on over 200 of the most frequently encountered garden plant problems by the Plant Doctors at the William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening. So … you’ve been reading my garden columns and I’ve convinced you that if a former news anchor can grow a garden on a balcony, how hard can it be? All Gardenista stories—from garden tours and expert advice to hand tools and furniture roundups. Mexican Feather Grass does lie down. If you don’t like this affect, you can give it a haircut with a few inches of the top to prevent flopping. It probably looks best if cut once or twice during the season. Also, be sure to pull out dead foliage new foliage emerges. However, if everything is pulling out easily, then the plant didn’t root well. Provide a well-drained soil (not too compact) and water regularly during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Reduce watering after establishment. In terms of the sage, we haven’t heard of mole problems. Moles tend to eat grubs in lawns. Voles, however, love spring perennials. If you are concerned, we’d suggest raised garden beds or dig a trench around the area that you want protected. Thanks for posting this. I always feel like I am the only one who fails at gardening. Like you, I will try again! Grass clippings from our yard is all I have used for years now. The clippings get dumped in a pile and left to dry out a bit first before I mulch with it. I only had a few weeds pop up here and there. Sorry about your tomatoes, Jill. Thanks for the information, and I’m interested to know what you find out with the testing. I haven’t had that particular problem, but I sure have enough other problems in the garden to figure out over the years. The garden was definitely lacking in interest. The top corner was the perfect place to create a feature that would be viewed from the house. Does anyone have experience using chemical-free grass clippings as mulch in the garden? Good idea or not so much? Hi Jill, I am new to Prairie Homestead, maybe a month or so. I have just had the time to sit down and start to catch up on all the info in your tool boxes ( we have just had our first snow/blizzard here in Tea, SD, so officially done with the garden.) I can now sit and rest a while :). I was just reading about your tomato catastrophe, so sorry. It is so hard to watch your hard work curl up and die and then not know why. I was wondering if you have ever used worm castings (Poo). My husband and I started using it about 3 years ago. Our gardens are the best they have ever been. Its 100%pure, OMRI certified.You can’t burn your vegetation, its safe around children and animals, heck you could eat it if you wanted to-my husband tried- he’s weird 🙂 It is an excellent soil builder also. I’m going to do something here, hope its OK. This is our side business now. We took a full growing season to test it out for ourselves before we made up our minds to sell it as whole sale distributors. Anyway this may be something you may want to check out. We use it with our composted leaves and grass clippings. I can not remember the last time we even entertained the idea of using any kind of harmful chemical on anything in & around our yard and gardens. We have read so much about this and it really hits home, knowing what goes into your body is just 1/2 the fight and you have to stay ever so vigilant. Well I hope that I was somewhat helpful for you. If you would like any information about Worm poop, I will send you a website so you can check it out for yourself. Wishing you & yours Good Luck in the next growing season. Shawn PS.I enjoy the rest during this time of year but I’m already thinking/planning my garden plots out for next year 😉 As much as it pains me to say this, I would NOT use any more hay on your garden until you can absolutely, 100% verify the hay or field it came from has not been sprayed with any sort of herbicide. I have used non-organic hay in the garden that I know was sprayed with broadleaf herbicides for 10 years and never had a problem with my plants. Maybe the concentrations weren’t high enough. But, 3 years ago, a neighbor up the valley from us sprayed his fields with 2,4-D and within a week my 150 tomato plants looked just like yours do. I didn’t connect it until the next year when another neighbor sprayed his fields with 2,4-D and I lost my tomato plants again and all of my lettuce that was just starting to head, bolted. I started talking to people and doing research and apparently, certain types of 2,4-D can really drift given the correct conditions. It affects plants drastically just by drift. Maybe you should look into the possibility that a neighbor sprayed something like 2,4-D on fields or lawns. Once it affects the plants, thats it for those plants. I let mine grow but they put on little to no flowers or fruit. This year, I planted in the same spot and didn’t remove the plant residue last fall. I waited until a week after the neighbor did his spraying and then transplanted my plants. Bingo, I had no trouble with my plants and they put on a good crop for us. So, it doesn’t seem to linger in the soil, at least for us. I have had a similar problem in my garden. I started a small area as a deep mulch bed, and NOTHING would sprout. Thinking that it was the chickens (they have only this year been let into the garden to free rang and have been eating any sprouts they can get there beaks on), I started some seeds and transplanted them. They grew for a few days, then just died. It was very strange. I hope its not this! Good question– we have had slightly less rain this year– but I’ve watered sufficiently. And we’ve had other dry years where the garden still thrived, so it’s hard to say for sure. My garden is full of old rubbish My garden is excessively hot and dry If you find you are having trouble with your garden, consider whether you’re making one of the above mistakes. It is always a good idea to consult with your local gardening center or any green thumbs you know if you are having a problem with your garden. A garden can be an extremely rewarding, relaxing activity once you have everything set up properly To be honest, this whole issue bothers me very, very deeply. Composted manure is cheap, it’s natural (most of the time), and is readily available. If we can no longer use it on our gardens, what then? The same goes for hay mulch… I can hardly stand the thought of being stripped of these options due to herbicides. I’m still ruminating on these thoughts… I’ll share more in an upcoming post. BioBelt Maxman Maxman Penigen 500 Anabolic Rx24 Celuraid Muscle Testogen Penigen 500 Maca peruana Celuraid Muscle

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