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Are there any space-stretching tricks I can use? An attractive standard plant, urn or statuette at the end of the garden will provide a focal point and draw the eye to the garden’s furthest part, tricking you into seeing it as larger than it is. Benches with lift-up lids give more storage. If you need a play area for children, swap tiles for decking in the lower part of the garden and sink a hidden sandpit beneath a section of it. ? https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/extension-search/ Where: One of the most destructive insect pests attacking small trees, shrubs and gardens. Lettuce and hostas are popular food for slugs, which can nibble garden plants to pieces. If you can begin to see the trillions of microbial creatures in your garden as your hidden workforce, then you are on the path to happy gardening. When we recognise that we are dealing with a workforce, then we understand that if we mistreat our workers, there will be increasing problems. Conversely, if we can look after them, they will look after us. Nutrition Gardening® is essentially a workplace health and safety issue. Health is about providing food and ideal living conditions for your workforce, while safety is about protecting them from toxins and poor soil management decisions. I know that putting manure on the garden is good for it, but what I didn’t know was that HORSE manure will completely destroy the soil and take 7-20 years to recover, whereas COW manure is what I should have used in the first place. Cows have 4 stomachs so their food is digested completely and ready to use as fertilizer, while on the other hand, horses only have one stomach so their food is somewhat digested and still has a ways to go before it is completely broken down. Horse manure will burn everything up in your garden and kill your trees. DON’T USE IT! Protect your flower and vegetable gardens from pests and disease with organic… If you can begin to see the trillions of microbial creatures in your garden as your hidden workforce, then you are on the path to happy gardening. When we recognise that we are dealing with a workforce, then we understand that if we mistreat our workers, there will be increasing problems. Conversely, if we can look after them, they will look after us. Nutrition Gardening® is essentially a workplace health and safety issue. Health is about providing food and ideal living conditions for your workforce, while safety is about protecting them from toxins and poor soil management decisions. When a problem is seen as insurmountable, it can stop people from doing anything, especially when added to worries about keeping plants alive. I’ve avoided being too technical and have emphasised an approach which is not time-consuming, or complicated. This is the kind of gardening that appeals to me. What sets us apart? David is a registered member of the Society of Garden Designers, a member of the British Association of Landscape Industries and has the title of Grand Designs Show Garden designer. He also mentors qualified garden designers and has worked many years in the garden design industry. Stewart acknowledged some parts of the garden are overgrown and said she already had plans to address the issues this week.  I’d like a wild garden To be honest, this whole issue bothers me very, very deeply. Composted manure is cheap, it’s natural (most of the time), and is readily available. If we can no longer use it on our gardens, what then? The same goes for hay mulch… I can hardly stand the thought of being stripped of these options due to herbicides. I’m still ruminating on these thoughts… I’ll share more in an upcoming post. The biggest problem with my garden is the soil or lack of it. Our soil is so sandy and no matter what I do to it, I cannot get it to become the kind of soil which is good for planting vegetables. I did get some really good cucumbers this year but that is all that has come up. Yes, I’ve heard a lot of people complaining about strange gardens this year. I don’t know what to think… So: you either 1) love moles enough to leave them alone, in which case they’ll constantly dig up your yard/ruin your garden, or 2) you like your lawn/garden without mole tunnels and mounds MORE than you love moles, which means getting rid of the moles by either trapping/re-homing them (which, as I said, will kill them 99 times out of 100) or setting kill traps. failing garden featured garden gardening Plants vegetables The first line of input contains two integer numbers n and k (1 ≤ n, k ≤ 100) — the number of buckets and the length of the garden, respectively. Even if it *were* possible to deter moles from tunneling your lawn or garden by tarring corncobs, planting gum in the ground without touching it, or setting up pinwheel wind-farms—which it most definitely isn’t—all you’ve done is solve your problem at the expense of introducing a problem for your neighbors. Which is a crappy thing to do to someone who lives next door to you. I’d like a wild garden Will it take much looking after? Once planted, this garden will look after itself — aside from the odd pruning of climbers, such as clematis, and the addition of some bright summer blooms, like lilies or poppies. Rake out thatch in September or early spring with a garden rake or scarifier. To prevent it coming back, collect the grass clippings if your mower has a grass box, or rake up all clippings after each mowing. I am container gardening on my deck and my tomato plants are turning yellow. 3. Your book features 57 gardening dilemmas and solutions for those dilemmas. How did you determine which dilemmas to include? Were they based on personal experience or did you survey a lot of gardeners to find the most common dilemmas? Is a follow-up book in the works with more gardening dilemmas? There are issues which come up again and again, like ‘My yard is too long and narrow’. I tend to write for people who are not horticultural experts but are design-aware (like me) and I see gardens on these terms. For a while I was gardening for a book publisher whose long, narrow garden was the length of a city block. It was difficult to rationalize the space. When I saw designer Chris Moss’s London garden, which is compartmentalized in a clever way, it stuck in my mind and was the first ‘problem’ to go into the book. Well Doctor, we’ve always said that part of the fun of gardening, is learning new things. The first step is to diagnose plant problems. Put on your investigator’s cap, examine the symptoms, identify the causes, administer the cure (most are quite simple), and learn some new « stuff ». As much as it pains me to say this, I would NOT use any more hay on your garden until you can absolutely, 100% verify the hay or field it came from has not been sprayed with any sort of herbicide. Salts applied to walkways and roads in winter may splash into garden; keep salty water off foliage. Flush soil with good water. Test soil for soluble salt level. 5. What gardening dilemma are you facing at the moment in your garden? My own garden has at least a dozen dilemmas, mainly to do with living in a cottage. The neighbors are very close but once you walk down toward the field that we back on to (where lambs are hopping about right now), then it is completely private. Though rather far from the house. Since writing the book I am changing my garden completely, after 12 years of indecision. 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