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I bought a new build house which was built on land previously probably thought unsuitable due to being damp and low lying, it had been a garden nursery. The garden didn’t drain, however the builders are only responsible for an area 1m ( I think it was) from the house walls. The builders also said that drainage will improve over time once land has settled. I’m not sure how it has panned out as the house was sold on. Very annoying. Prob not much you can do without spending money. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/weeds/conventional-weed-killers.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/weed-it-and-reap-how-to-make-your-garden-more-appealing-without-chemicals.htm Want seclusion? Then this is the garden for you. All walls/fences have trellis panels fixed to their fronts and tops so that climbers can be trained up to hide the space from onlookers. The wide S-shaped path is cobbled for a relaxed feel, so make sure you choose a table and chairs with chunky legs to avoid wobble. Go for low-maintenance exotics, which provide year-round interest, and place large plants, such as tree ferns and a windmill palm, in the borders, so that the shed can’t be seen from indoors and the bench is hidden from neighbouring houses. Passionflowers grow quickly, but won’t damage fences or brickwork if given supports, such as a trellis, to cling to. Kendra Wilson trained as a gardener at Cottesbrooke Hall in Northamptonshire, before joining Gardenista when it launched five years ago. Besides The Problem with My Garden, she has co-written The Book of the Dog for Laurence King, as well as The Book of the Bird. Before moving to the country, she lived in central London and was a designer and picture editor, starting at Vogue and ending at the Observer. This sounds like a wonderful book. I would love to add it to my treasured gardening books. In the years I’ve been advocating for the deep mulch method of gardening, I’ve had a couple people ask if I’ve ever had problems using non-organic hay. We get our hay from a variety of sources, and looking back, I’m almost certain some of it had to be sprayed at some point. However, as I always had thriving gardens by using our compost and hay mulch, I figured people who were concerned about non-organic hay or non-organic animal manure were worrying unnecessarily. I was wrong. Hello am66,     Is there any way you can find a space in your back garden for the feeders, I assume that is fenced off for your greyhound as he would be a good deterrent to the cats.  I’m sorry you found feathers and remains of a bird but it is possible a Sparrowhawk could have predated the bird and not a cat as I think cats tend to take their prey away/ home and in tact.     There is an ultrasonic device that seems to get good reviews on Amazon website  HERE   and I know a fellow member on here (  Monkeycheese ) has just purchased two of them so maybe when he has had chance to test them out he can advise you how well they work.    Good luck, hope the cats get the message to stay out of your garden so you can continue to enjoy the visiting birds.    You know about this, right? http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/pest-control/herbicide-damage-zmgz13fmzsto.aspx The Edible Balcony garden team has installed Glowpear planters in the courtyards and balconies of several clients with huge success. A client overlooking Bondi Beach has recently harvested tomatoes, spinach and even ginger. Great article – I was having problems with a mole in my garden for many years, and tried various methods of getting rid but with no such luck! So a neighbour recommended that I used a traditional mole catcher, and called this guy www.lancashiremolecatcher.com Pollinate with brush, or by shaking plant so that pollen will fall to female flowers (depending on kind). Attract pollinators to garden. Do not kill pollinating insects. In search of a publisher for his latest book, Sacramento garden designer Michael Glassman found a perfect fit an ocean away – in Australia. The result is a problem-solving work of art with built-in appeal on both sides of the Pacific. so what about the garden that won’t ‘develope ‘ root crops?? If rock gardening is not your cup of tea, you might consider the xeriscape as a practical alternative to more traditional yard designs. Although xeriscaping is associated with drought-plagued areas, don’t underestimate the benefits it can bring to yards far-removed from the desert. You can save yourself time and money by planting low-maintenance, drought-tolerant perennials, in addition to grouping plants with similar irrigation needs together in your yard. Remedies: Mild to moderately over-fertilized plants may be able to be saved by flooding the garden bed with water to push the fertilizer deep into the soil. Severely burnt plants may never recover, so if it’s early in the growing season you may want to compost them and replant. I was informed of such a possibility two years ago when I tried to straw bale garden and it was an epic flop. I was told to use alfalfa hay only as that is obviously not sprayed with a broadleaf herbicide. Try that! The most important benefit of fungi, however, is their capacity to create crumb structure in your soil. This is the most desirable characteristic for garden soils. A soil with crumb structure can breathe freely while allowing ease of root growth and ideal water infiltration. Earthworms move unimpeded through these aggregates, as do beneficial nematodes and microarthropods. You can plunge your hands deep into this medium and it smells good enough to eat. Gardening is pure pleasure when you have achieved this holy grail of good soil management, but it is not possible without nurturing your fungal workforce. Life Force® Instant Humus™ involves super-concentrated soluble humic acid granules. Two teaspoons of these black crystals are added to a watering can full of water, and applied to 10 m2 of soil. You will almost hear your fungi rejoice! Great article – I was having problems with a mole in my garden for many years, and tried various methods of getting rid but with no such luck! So a neighbour recommended that I used a traditional mole catcher, and called this guy www.lancashiremolecatcher.com The first line of input contains two integer numbers n and k (1 ≤ n, k ≤ 100) — the number of buckets and the length of the garden, respectively. I read this post with great interest, as I garden on limestone and so I have brought in many things to try to improve my soil. My most recent efforts have been with wood chips due to becoming acquainted with a man who has a tree-trimming business, and leaves, which we have picked up curbside from people who have our phone number to call when they have them bagged and ready to take away. I hate to tell you that we will no longer be doing either of these things. Trying new plants and designs in your garden is wonderful! I’d like an elegant vegetable garden Oh My Gosh, when you described what happen to your garden happened to my garden I planted 50 foot row of corn and 6 plants came up and never did get bigger than 12 inches. My green beans I had 4 plants and picked 3 beans off. My husband dumped manure and old hay out of the goat/sheep barn and he feed hay which I am sure had been sprayed. Thank you for telling us about your problem. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/weeds/conventional-weed-killers.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/weed-it-and-reap-how-to-make-your-garden-more-appealing-without-chemicals.htm To supply nitrogen – I have fond memories of my Dad planting his blue lupin cover crop in our vegetable garden. I was paid ten cents an hour to chop up and turn in this dense, metre-high mass. A few weeks later the soil was churning with happy earthworms and our nitrogen-rich soil was ready to plant. Legumes, like lupins, clovers and lucerne, fix nitrogen from the atmosphere and deliver this desirable ammonium form of nitrogen into the root zone. The ideal ratio between ammonium and nitrate nitrogen is 3:1 (in favour of ammonium nitrogen) and this ratio is a big player in pest resistance. You may struggle to achieve this resilience ratio in your garden without some legumes present in the planting mix. Eron Plus Tonus Fortis Zevs Testogen Zevs vigrx Tonus Fortis eracto BioBelt Maxman

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