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There will, however, be others that do not share the same enthusiasm when it comes to gardening, and will simply give their gardens a ‘once over’ with the lawn mower every few weeks. Then there will be the Problem Neighbours who see their gardens as an excuse to use it as a makeshift area in which to store excess rubbish. I had a similar problem this year…new garden…new wood mulch…some things did great, tomatoes failed. I did research and it says wood and straw mulch can do good at first but they PULL THE NITROGEN out of the soil so the plants can fail. I believe that’s what happened. My research said compost OR leaf mulch is actually the best for your garden. Will chickens destroy my garden? I used to gather great quantities of hay and straw for my gardens. No longer. This is a huge problem in straw and manure all across the US and almost impossible to avoid. Don’t forget mole crickets. Very destructive to gardens and a real problem in Florida..even the pythons won’t touch them (lol). I do not know if you would even have a possibly source available near you being in a prairie. However, perhaps look into the Back to Eden style of no till garden. The method uses chipped/shredded wood(tree trimmings) as a mulch and with adding regular compost, which gets distributed down through the chips, it is wonderful(so far at least) and does great things. As much as it pains me to say this, I would NOT use any more hay on your garden until you can absolutely, 100% verify the hay or field it came from has not been sprayed with any sort of herbicide. This year we will be launching a unique online garden design tutorial package at a fraction of the cost of any design fee.  We have created videos showing you how to survey your garden and how to use the simple basic principles of garden design. Together, we will design your very own outdoor living space which will lead you … up your own garden path! My garden is too big Image source: veggiegardeningtips.com Roses, the world’s favourite flowers, are great garden performers that, if well cared for, will live for many years. We’re in a new build house and are now outside of our warranty (by over 12 months). The garden has been an issue since we moved in (2012) specifically with drainage. Whilst in the warranty, we had the drainage re done and this was eventually completed in spring 2015 (outside warranty but delayed on new build company’s part due to waiting for warmer weather and deadlines on the new houses on the estate). Fast forward a year, the garden still doesn’t drain properly. We’ve got in a professional to give us a quote on sorting it and was willing to pay ourselves to get it sorted. It’s come back at £7k to fix and landscape it better than what it’s been done when we first moved in. Landscaper is suggesting that the soil is the problem and the drainage not being right. I was willing to pay a bit to sort it but now I’m annoyed that we’ve paid all this money for a house and basically haven’t got what we want; what’s worse, we need to pay around £7k to fix without adding any value. Have we got a legal case to take this back to the new build company? I hear from neighbours that they’ve got similar problems with drainage and gardens being ruined, but not sure if we individually have a case, or if we have a collective claim as it seems that when they’ve developed the site, they’ve not accounted for the fact they’re building into a hill. The drainage is shocking. I’m pissed off as this was our « dream home » and for 3 years we haven’t had a proper garden. Any recommendations of solicitors who deal with this kind of thing would be very welcome. We moved into our current house two years ago, it’s twelve years old, north facing rear garden. The lawn area (and most of the garden to be honest is a mess), we got a lot standing water when it rains, and the grass squelches when walked on. The area closest to the house is the worst. The cause was of course builders rubble, clay and clay subsoil which is just below the turf (which is a shockingly poor turf). Winter doesn’t mean you can’t have a garden. It just means you’ll need to do a little extra work. This week our columnist Lydia Harvey shows us how easy it is to start a garden – even when you don’t have a lot of space. My garden is a field « There is an Extension publication, EC 1586, ‘Using home remedies to control garden pests’ that offers a bit more information. » Good morning. I have the same problem and have not used the same products as you. My veggies have been very small and take longer to grow. I have spoken with many growers even those with roadside stands. We are all having the same problem. I’ve been fortunate to have produced more than some of the others. I do have a container garden. But have the curling leaves and small produce. Just thought I’d pass along a little extra info for you. Unfortunately, a lot of people start to think about composting in the Spring. They’re anxious to get out in the garden, have heard—or know—that compost is a great natural fertilizer, soil amendment and disease preventer, and want to get a pile going. But nine times out of ten—maybe more like 9.9 times out of ten—they don’t have THE most important ingredient: Shredded fall leaves. Having a variety of herbs growing in the garden means you can easily pick and add them straight into food that is being prepared. The most important benefit of fungi, however, is their capacity to create crumb structure in your soil. This is the most desirable characteristic for garden soils. A soil with crumb structure can breathe freely while allowing ease of root growth and ideal water infiltration. Earthworms move unimpeded through these aggregates, as do beneficial nematodes and microarthropods. You can plunge your hands deep into this medium and it smells good enough to eat. Gardening is pure pleasure when you have achieved this holy grail of good soil management, but it is not possible without nurturing your fungal workforce. Life Force® Instant Humus™ involves super-concentrated soluble humic acid granules. Two teaspoons of these black crystals are added to a watering can full of water, and applied to 10 m2 of soil. You will almost hear your fungi rejoice! My garden is too big To manage pests and nurture bees – plants like mustard and marigolds are very effective in countering the most destructive of all crop pests, root knot nematodes. Brassicas emit biochemicals from their roots, which can reduce root disease in other food crops. However, it is important to rotate brassica plantings in your garden with other species to avoid a buildup of these chemicals. Cover crops can also serve as trap crops for pests to keep them away from your vegetables. Alternatively, they can also be host plants for beneficial predators. Flowering cover crops can also attract and feed pollinators. This will boost production in your garden while feeding the all-important honey bee. These creatures are really struggling around the globe at present. A condition called Colony Collapse Disorder is decimating beehives, to the point that beekeeping is no longer a viable profession in some regions. Insecticides called neonicotinoids, GMO crops and electromagnetic radiation from phone towers seem to have combined to mess up the immunity and communication skills of these critically important creatures. Einstein suggested that the world lasts just four years in the absence of the honey bee and their pollination gift. Your garden can serve as a chemical-free haven, to help preserve our bees. 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