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4. What is one of the most interesting or unusual gardening dilemmas you have ever encountered? There is a spread in the book that says: ‘I have high walls and railings’. I wanted to put it in because the house, on a busy arterial road through East London, has the most incongruous front garden, which separates the whole property from its surroundings in such an imaginative way. It’s filled with jungly creepers and roses, climbing not only up the railings but over the facade of the four-story house. The planting is done with a lot of gusto, punctuated by brilliantly arcane statuary. Everything looked fine when I first put them in the garden. I planted my tomatoes (Amish Paste) in a new spot this year– normally they are along my fence, but this year, I had more plants so I stuck them in the area I usually plant my onions. I mulched them and watered them, and sat back to watch them grow. Remedies: Mild to moderately over-fertilized plants may be able to be saved by flooding the garden bed with water to push the fertilizer deep into the soil. Severely burnt plants may never recover, so if it’s early in the growing season you may want to compost them and replant. Search for the solution by plant type or by garden problem. You will find easily identifiable images of the most common problems. This then leads you to the best solution/s. If you are unable to find an answer, check our FAQs or Contact Us. Mushroom soil is not good for a garden. I put a load of about 5 tons in mine 15 years ago. Worst garden crops ever and tons of weed. Found out that mushroom soil is composted horse manure – loads of weed seeds! But as I started to do more research and dig deeper into my strange garden problems, my heart sunk. Utah State University Extension provides informal education outreach to residents throughout the state. This question-and-answer column is designed to give you research-based information whether your gardening interest is producing fresh food, creating a landscape area or anything in between. My garden is excessively hot and dry So how can you keep rodents out the garden, and from potentially entering your home?  Two very good things happened in 2012. Soon after the launch of Gardenista (No. 1), UK-based Kendra Wilson became our first contributing writer. She immediately took our readers—and me—by the hand and began to gently reassure us there is nothing scary or complicated about gardening. In 2010 my husband built raised beds that outline our residential side and back yards. We bought three way mix from a local nursery. We spent several hundred dollars having two dump trucks full of gardening three-way mix delivered and spent a month shoveling. We planted starts and seeds. The veggie starts, including several types squash, beans, green beans, cukes and tomatoes. They all died. I planted seeds that never came up. Replanted with starts, they died. I had an all over failure. Then we find out our county made national news for crop failures due to Aminopyralid poisoned manuer that passed unprocessed through our huge local dairy cow population (Whatcom County, WA). Vegetable Gardening for Beginners! Your complete guide on how to grow a vegetable garden—from scratch! All Gardenista stories—from garden tours and expert advice to hand tools and furniture roundups. I bought a new build house which was built on land previously probably thought unsuitable due to being damp and low lying, it had been a garden nursery. The garden didn’t drain, however the builders are only responsible for an area 1m ( I think it was) from the house walls. The builders also said that drainage will improve over time once land has settled. I’m not sure how it has panned out as the house was sold on. Very annoying. Prob not much you can do without spending money. Lettuce and hostas are popular food for slugs, which can nibble garden plants to pieces. SEND TO Case Study, Your Home and Garden, Bauer Media, Private Bag 92512, Wellesley Street, Auckland 1010, or email yhg@bauermedia.co.nz. We can’t feature everyone’s garden in the magazine, but if you’d like some personal design advice, you can contact Carol at carolbucknell.co.nz. One of the most common questions I get asked as I traverse the country hosting garden workshops is, “what do I do about possums?” Hello am66,     Is there any way you can find a space in your back garden for the feeders, I assume that is fenced off for your greyhound as he would be a good deterrent to the cats.  I’m sorry you found feathers and remains of a bird but it is possible a Sparrowhawk could have predated the bird and not a cat as I think cats tend to take their prey away/ home and in tact.     There is an ultrasonic device that seems to get good reviews on Amazon website  HERE   and I know a fellow member on here (  Monkeycheese ) has just purchased two of them so maybe when he has had chance to test them out he can advise you how well they work.    Good luck, hope the cats get the message to stay out of your garden so you can continue to enjoy the visiting birds.    I bought a new build house which was built on land previously probably thought unsuitable due to being damp and low lying, it had been a garden nursery. The garden didn’t drain, however the builders are only responsible for an area 1m ( I think it was) from the house walls. The builders also said that drainage will improve over time once land has settled. I’m not sure how it has panned out as the house was sold on. Very annoying. Prob not much you can do without spending money. Print one integer number — the minimum number of hours required to water the garden. New garden owners panic sometimes panic about things they’ve heard; received wisdom can be quite detrimental. Wisteria, for instance, has a reputation for being difficult. A brief explanation that I received while training at Cottesbrooke Hall has always stuck; in its logic, it is not difficult at all. The same goes for roses, which I also talk about. More is to be gained from doing, than reading, and the friendly tone of my book will hopefully get people to open the back door, secateurs in hand. I’ve visited Patrick’s community garden; it’s a nice little urban oasis. But that urban setting makes being realistic about potential vermin problems crucial. Its very easy to breed the nasty, dangerous things, and much harder to get the population to go in the other direction. So here are some ideas. Most are problems gardeners experience almost anywhere, but some problems are more specific to our area. In our resource guide, we have followed an integrated pest management approach where simple, safe, and less invasive strategies are listed first. This is the same approach we use with visitors to our walk-in Plant Doctor service located in the Kemper Center for Home Gardening as well as with callers to our phone-in Horticultural Answer Service. Recommendations using chemical pesticides, though not excluded in an integrated pest management approach, generally appear lower down in the list of recommended strategies. Strictly organic strategies are pointed out. You can look up pest and problems by plant or pest category. When Apple first enabled third party applications on the iPhone1, they were accused by many of violating user freedoms by creating a walled garden, that being the requirement that all applications installed on the platform must be installed via their iOS App store2. Apple promoted this as allowing application vetting for performance and security: particularly on earlier iPhone models with limited resources, this ‘curation’ process of vetting the reliability and safety of applications may very well have had a positive impact on the growth of the platform. Atlant Gel Celuraid Muscle erogran Erozon Max BioBelt power up premium BeMass erozon max power up premium Testogen

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