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Rubbish which has been left piled up in a garden is also cause for concern and could attract things like rats, mice and other pests. Obviously, this then creates a health hazard, with the Risk Of Rat Infestation, as well as attracting a whole host of other unwanted pests. Once again, the Environmental Health Department can forcibly order your neighbours to get rid of any rubbish or weeds if they are breaking the law, and legal action can ensue if they fail to do so. The critical points occur when $\dfrac{dC}{dx} = 0$: \[ \begin{align*} \dfrac{dC}{dx} = 0 &= -\dfrac{600}{x^2} + 2 \\[8px] -2 &= -\dfrac{600}{x^2} \\[8px] x^2 &= \dfrac{600}{2} \\[8px] &= 300 \\[8px] x &= \sqrt{300} \end{align*} \] Note that we choose the positive square root since the width x cannot be negative. Also note that we could have a critical point where $\dfrac{dC}{dx} = -\dfrac{600}{x^2} + 2$ is undefined, which occurs when $x=0$. That answer makes no physical sense, though, since then Sam’s garden would have zero area. We thus continue our analysis with the single critical point $$x = \sqrt{300}$$ The garden was definitely lacking in interest. The top corner was the perfect place to create a feature that would be viewed from the house. For those who want to avoid putting traps out around the garden, pest control company Ehrlich has four tips for steering rats away.  Dear Real Living: I read with significant consternation the Friday, Jan. 17, article headlined « Prevent a garden slugfest with baits, maintenance. » Perhaps my having attended Pentacle Theatre’s production of « Dr. Doolittle » inspired me to point out a gross injustice. The article itself was fine, but the accompanying photo clearly pictured a Pacific banana slug (Ariolimax columbianus). This species, by far the largest and most obvious slug in our parts, is NOT a garden pest. These critters feed on detritus and dead plant material, not on living vegetation. As such, they actually help clean up our yards, not exfoliate them. Unfortunately, the SJ article will most certainly encourage people not aware of these slugs’ good intentions to dispatch them at every opportunity. Bad for the garden, truly tragic for the banana slugs. — Alex Bourdeau, West Salem But what if you want to live a healthier lifestyle and grow your own food? What if you’re time poor or you don’t have the space to maintain a large garden to grow your own food? Kendra Wilson trained as a gardener at Cottesbrooke Hall in Northamptonshire, before joining Gardenista when it launched five years ago. Besides The Problem with My Garden, she has co-written The Book of the Dog for Laurence King, as well as The Book of the Bird. Before moving to the country, she lived in central London and was a designer and picture editor, starting at Vogue and ending at the Observer. Here are tips on how to identify and get rid of moles in the garden or yard. I container gardening last year adding some more this spring. I would love to have a vegetable/fruit garden in the yard, however, due a neighbor’s tree I only have a large root and hard, dry compacted dirt. I’m Ohio, with extremely unpredictable weather. ANY input is welcome on how to start this garden and the soil prep. Flooding my garden 3. Your book features 57 gardening dilemmas and solutions for those dilemmas. How did you determine which dilemmas to include? Were they based on personal experience or did you survey a lot of gardeners to find the most common dilemmas? Is a follow-up book in the works with more gardening dilemmas? There are issues which come up again and again, like ‘My yard is too long and narrow’. I tend to write for people who are not horticultural experts but are design-aware (like me) and I see gardens on these terms. For a while I was gardening for a book publisher whose long, narrow garden was the length of a city block. It was difficult to rationalize the space. When I saw designer Chris Moss’s London garden, which is compartmentalized in a clever way, it stuck in my mind and was the first ‘problem’ to go into the book. I had an experience this year with my mulch garden. I used a sprinkler with our well water (artesian water with high pH) and watered during a hot day (95+) temps. We usually use a soaker hose or rainwater, but tried the sprinkler this year. It totally burned the tomato, potato, and melon leaves. The rest of the garden didn’t look that great either. Another lesson learned after over 30 years of gardening. Our pest and problem pages contain information on over 200 of the most frequently encountered garden plant problems by the Plant Doctors at the William T. Kemper Center for Home Gardening. Just wondering where your garden is located? Thanks. Are you in Richmond, Virginia? Thanks. Suzanne Flynn Books are great sources of gardening information! We love to help gardeners here at Gardening Know How, we are a great source of information and love to help with all your garden questions! My garden is too small Good question– we have had slightly less rain this year– but I’ve watered sufficiently. And we’ve had other dry years where the garden still thrived, so it’s hard to say for sure. Garden Gift Hub is one of the most thoughtful and interesting places on the web to find original and useful gardening and nature inspired products. Rake out thatch in September or early spring with a garden rake or scarifier. To prevent it coming back, collect the grass clippings if your mower has a grass box, or rake up all clippings after each mowing. Dudeni, if it’s thick clay and north facing, I’d consider going grass less. You’ll never get a good lawn with those conditions. You’ll be permanently fighting moss and bad drainage. Your problem isn’t easily rectified and lack of sun is something you can’t solve. I’d seriously consider a different style of garden. There are several reasons for poor garden drainage. On new housing estates, it is often caused by compacted soil as a result of builders’ lorries and trucks. This combined with the mixing of sub-soil and topsoil when all the trenches and foundations were excavated often leads to a heavy, wet plot. Thank you for sharing this. It certainly would have been easier to just blog the good events. We have noticed residual effects from straw we have got from non-organic neighbors (our organic friends won’t sell straw as it is returned to the soil). I would try a trial with some plants in the garden next year to see if the results are the same (even if you don’t intend to harvest and use). The reason I say this is that we have had a weird gardening season here as well with low results on a number of vegetable crops (and we are not the only ones to see the same thing). Not the same problems as you describe but far from typical. Hopefully this is an aberration for you and not a contamination issue. I enjoy you site and wish you the best. Extractive agriculture has seen the long-term, persistent removal of these broad spectrum trace minerals with no replacement. In fact, it could be argued that most plants no longer have the associated hormonal support to achieve their genetic potential. The exception is the seaweed plant, which exists in a soup comprising the perfect balance of all minerals. Consequently, this plant contains forty times more of these hormonal helpers than land plants. What does this mean for this sea plant? Well, it is the fastest-growing plant on the planet, producing 30 cm of new growth every day. 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