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Q. Mike: I’m hoping you can help kick-start a new program at our community garden. Historically, we’ve had one large cold compost heap that was an unmanaged eyesore. The « compost committee » has chosen to move in a new direction and have the individual gardeners create and manage their own composting. Some gardeners are planning to group together and build large 3-bin systems; others just want a small pile for their own 10 x 10 plot. Either way, we’re urging them to learn ‘hot composting’ techniques, as I know that compost that heats up quickly is far superior to the cold kind, and takes much less time to finish. Any advice to get us started on the right track? My heirloom tomatoes looked just like this in my garden this year! Unfortunately, I agree with your “detective work” and conclusions. I don’t know if the source of the toxicity was from my mulch, straw/hay mulch, or drift from surrounding farm crop fields. My overall garden was pretty much a failure this year, despite good weather conditions, multiple plantings, and good care. I’m obviously going to have to do something different next year…not sure what! Thanks for sharing your experiences, please keep us posted! If you can begin to see the trillions of microbial creatures in your garden as your hidden workforce, then you are on the path to happy gardening. When we recognise that we are dealing with a workforce, then we understand that if we mistreat our workers, there will be increasing problems. Conversely, if we can look after them, they will look after us. Nutrition Gardening® is essentially a workplace health and safety issue. Health is about providing food and ideal living conditions for your workforce, while safety is about protecting them from toxins and poor soil management decisions. With increasing amounts of mole hills on her lawn and moles now burrowing under her flowerbed, Tiffany Daneff looks at ways of controlling the moles in her garden. 2015 saw an eruption of mini volcanos. It’s the warm and wet weather that encourages them. And not just in the fields. There’s been way too much mole action in the garden too, and I’m fed up. One hill I could cope with. Two, even. But now there are three – as well as plenty of signs that he/she/they are digging under the flower beds. Which is not good. Not least because once they begin to breed there could be loads more. So leaving well alone was not an option. I wanted the mole/s out. I’m daunted by the garden I’ve inherited Just wondering where your garden is located? Thanks. Are you in Richmond, Virginia? Thanks. Suzanne Flynn “The Garden Bible” is built on case studies of fantastic-looking and functional garden spaces that started as problematic landscapes. The issues may not at first appear apparent because the solutions work so well. My garden is a field 300px wide Good luck, hope Brian helps protect your back garden so you can continue enjoying the birdlife . Thank you for sharing this. It certainly would have been easier to just blog the good events. We have noticed residual effects from straw we have got from non-organic neighbors (our organic friends won’t sell straw as it is returned to the soil). I would try a trial with some plants in the garden next year to see if the results are the same (even if you don’t intend to harvest and use). The reason I say this is that we have had a weird gardening season here as well with low results on a number of vegetable crops (and we are not the only ones to see the same thing). Not the same problems as you describe but far from typical. Hopefully this is an aberration for you and not a contamination issue. I enjoy you site and wish you the best. My garden is overlooked on several sides Here are tips on how to identify and get rid of moles in the garden or yard. Malta has made significant inroads into improving sustainability, as reflected in the M&G Garden 2017. These lessons – compost more, recycle water wherever possible, grow native plants – are ones easily brought home to any garden for the wider benefit of the environment. James’ design proves that putting the right plant in the right place creates a healthy environment. Crucially, they will inspire garden lovers to turn what were once problem patches into areas of opportunity and growth. These articles have some garden design ideas for you. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/extension-search/ Print one integer number — the minimum number of hours required to water the garden. Great! A blank slate! Visit local garden centers and greenhouses. Check out other gardens in your neighborhood for inspiration. You know about this, right? http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/pest-control/herbicide-damage-zmgz13fmzsto.aspx Thanks for posting this. I always feel like I am the only one who fails at gardening. Like you, I will try again! At first I just thought it was coincidence and that I simply lost the gamble this year… (Because we all know that homesteading, and especially gardening, is a bit of a gamble. Or maybe a game of Russian Roulette rather…) In keeping with the constraint of a non-authoritative personality (Table 1: ISC2), The Idea Garden communicates its suggestions via a non-authoritative character we call the Gardening Consultant (Fig. 3). Imbuing such characters with a personality can evoke emotions in the user, such as humor, appreciation or social feelings, and when such emotions are positive, they can enhance the quality and creativity of users’ ideas (Lewis et al., 2011; Nass and Moon, 2000). Also, a recent study showed that end-user programmers respond well to instructions given in a non-authoritarian voice (Lee and Ko, 2011). Therefore, the Gardening Consultant’s icon looks like a tentative, quizzical face, intended to provoke mild humor. Some of the suggestions also contain questions, to reinforce this non-authoritarian personality. The Gardening Consultant understands the user’s problems in CoScripter about as much as a teacher gardener understands problems in a student gardener’s garden: a lot in general, but not that much about that particular student’s soil, neighboring plants, resident insects, etc. Rubbish which has been left piled up in a garden is also cause for concern and could attract things like rats, mice and other pests. Obviously, this then creates a health hazard, with the Risk Of Rat Infestation, as well as attracting a whole host of other unwanted pests. Once again, the Environmental Health Department can forcibly order your neighbours to get rid of any rubbish or weeds if they are breaking the law, and legal action can ensue if they fail to do so. Large front gardens: what’s the point? You’re welcome am66,  I hope you continue to enjoy your bird friendly garden and see lots of nice visitors, especially during the spring season.  If you have a nesting box you may find a Blue Tit will find your garden and maybe raise a brood.  There is lots of information on this website for nesting boxes and attracting more birds into the garden.  If you do want to add a nesting box, for better success try facing it between North and East direction and about 10ft off the ground.  For sparrows you could put a box under the eaves of the house.      Good luck, sounds like you have a lovely garden with shrubs to attract the birds 🙂 Unfortunately, gardeners are often obstinate optimists in such matters. They want to start composting NOW, don’t have any hoarded leaves and ‘Know I’m Wrong’. At least until rats show up wearing party hats and wielding little Wind-in-the-Willows dinnerware. I have a lack of time for upkeep and need a garden that will be somewhat self-sufficient. If you have any questions about any of the services we offer OR just want some gardening advice then please feel free to get in touch. eracto Maxman eracto power up premium Tonus Fortis VigRX Steroïden TestX Core Masculin Active Celuraid Muscle

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