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Image source: veggiegardeningtips.com Stewart acknowledged some parts of the garden are overgrown and said she already had plans to address the issues this week.  Sign up to receive our eco newsletter full of great organic gardening tips plus product updates and offers. I love to garden; but am still a bit of a novice. I need all the help I can get. I’d like an elegant vegetable garden Sorry to hear about your garden! Such a bummer. 🙁 My garden is on a steep slope The ones I recommend have self-watering or wicking systems that solve the biggest headache for time-poor gardeners – remembering to water your plants! They also improve relationships with apartment neighbours below who understandably might not appreciate water cascading onto their balcony. It would appear the tomato problem is a nation wide issue. If that’s the case, is it solar activity, chemtrails, acid rain, etc???? Many gardeners in my area who never use compost or mulch and are having the same problem. Healthy growth is the mainstay of every garden. Why design something that looks great on the drawing board but fails to provide the right environment for plants to thrive? You end up wasting time, money, energy and possibly even harming your garden environment. Hace you thought trying industrial hemp? I read is fantastic for replacing hay and for mulching! Not expensive at all. Research it and let me know. I wish I had land but I am a balcony gardener :-). Blessings! Sorry to hear about your garden! Such a bummer. 🙁 Here’s where all the answers are.  Well okay maybe not ALL the answers but if you’ve got a gardening problem then our Organic Problem Solver section is a good place to start.  Just select one of the sections to get started. While spotting a rat in the garden can be an unpleasant experience and they can damage fruit, vegetables, bulbs, plants, shed doors and wires, they should also be considered a serious health risk.  3. Your book features 57 gardening dilemmas and solutions for those dilemmas. How did you determine which dilemmas to include? Were they based on personal experience or did you survey a lot of gardeners to find the most common dilemmas? Is a follow-up book in the works with more gardening dilemmas? There are issues which come up again and again, like ‘My yard is too long and narrow’. I tend to write for people who are not horticultural experts but are design-aware (like me) and I see gardens on these terms. For a while I was gardening for a book publisher whose long, narrow garden was the length of a city block. It was difficult to rationalize the space. When I saw designer Chris Moss’s London garden, which is compartmentalized in a clever way, it stuck in my mind and was the first ‘problem’ to go into the book. This sounds like a wonderful book. I would love to add it to my treasured gardening books. Water will ‘find its way’ over time so unless you are at the bottom of a hill it could improve. Also planting trees that will suck up that water in the summer could help. But I’ve lived in houses where all the top soil was removed for building them, then never returned. Could that be the prob? I would wait another year or so in case it improves itself then plan garden around it. Will it take much looking after? Raised beds can be much easier to look after than borders and you won’t need to get on all fours to tend them. The rest of this garden is given over to paving, which will only need an occasional sweep. Two very good things happened in 2012. Soon after the launch of Gardenista (No. 1), UK-based Kendra Wilson became our first contributing writer. She immediately took our readers—and me—by the hand and began to gently reassure us there is nothing scary or complicated about gardening. My garden is under siege  My wife’s family grows alfalfa and I have been using hay from their barn floors for the last few years to deep mulch my garden. Been loving it and my garden grows great……….however…..I have been worried about this issue as they recently planted a field of “Round Up Ready Alfalfa.” You can no longer assume that alfalfa isn’t sprayed with herbicides. They have been using grass killers in alfalfa fields for years. Most garden plants aren’t grasses so maybe that’s why it’s been a bit of a non issue……but the effect of round up residues may potentially bring about different concerns. Thanks for sharing Jill. I’ll be keeping a close eye on things as I have been hoping this wouldn’t be an issue. My garden plants are not growing well, just not growing taller or developing well. Some tomatoes blooming, but growth very small. Pepper plants still very small. If I add organic compost or peat moss, should I do this right on top of the existing soil and just lightly turn it around the existing plants, or do I wait until this season is over and just start in the fall? I hate to waste the remainder of the season. THanks for any help! Grow disease-resistant varieties. Keep garden weed free and clean. I am container gardening on my deck and my tomato plants are turning yellow. How can I cut costs? Raised beds look great, but will cost money to install, so you could opt for ground-level planting. Small gardens are more interesting if you add extras, like water features, but you could replace these with more borders and swap decorative paving for gravel or decking. What animal it might be will depend on your location. It is likely not a mole, because of its diet. Voles (similar to mice) dig shallow tunnels that run along the lawn, as moles do; these rodents can be destructive in the garden. Other small rodents, such as mice might be a possibility as well. Chipmunks also dig tunnels, although you might not see the tunnels running along the surface. Gophers leave mounds of dirt at tunnel entrances, but not tunnels along the grass. Large holes could be a woodchuck, but they don’t have shallow tunnels. Rabbits, crows, raccoons, squirrels, coyotes, deer . . . just about any animal that eats fruit as part of its diet will take advantage of a melon. Raccoons like melons (and corn) especially. What animal it is will affect how you protect the fruit. Good luck! 4. What is one of the most interesting or unusual gardening dilemmas you have ever encountered? There is a spread in the book that says: ‘I have high walls and railings’. I wanted to put it in because the house, on a busy arterial road through East London, has the most incongruous front garden, which separates the whole property from its surroundings in such an imaginative way. It’s filled with jungly creepers and roses, climbing not only up the railings but over the facade of the four-story house. The planting is done with a lot of gusto, punctuated by brilliantly arcane statuary. Will chickens destroy my garden? i have trouble with critters eating my garden I have a constant battle with weeds in my garden. My garden is like a bog The best way to maintain a healthy garden is to educate yourself and learn to identify common “bad bugs.” Inspect your garden regularly to detect problems early. The sooner a pest is identified the easier it will be to manage using earth-friendly methods. Below we’ve listed several garden invaders that you may encounter. Click on each pest picture for a description and our list of organic remedies. Rock the pots You’ve successfully kept a small pot of herbs alive and feel like you can expand out. To do this, buy a large garden pot and fill it with soil, add seedlings and water regularly. This works well for silverbeet, strawberries even tomatoes and chillies. Also check out miniature fruit trees which thrive in pots. erogran eracto Anabolic Rx24 erogan Eron Plus BioBelt TestX Core power up premium Zevs Atlant Gel

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