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I’ve visited Patrick’s community garden; it’s a nice little urban oasis. But that urban setting makes being realistic about potential vermin problems crucial. Its very easy to breed the nasty, dangerous things, and much harder to get the population to go in the other direction. So here are some ideas. I was informed of such a possibility two years ago when I tried to straw bale garden and it was an epic flop. I was told to use alfalfa hay only as that is obviously not sprayed with a broadleaf herbicide. Try that! i just got a raised pnalter .3 5 and 22in tall. I plan on growing herbs in it (maybe a vegetable, too). What kind of soil/mix of soil should i use to fill it.a cheaper version seems to be 3 cubic foot bags of garden soil by Kellogg any opinions?should I mix in compost..how much?should i add any sand?worms?anything else?I am new to this and want to do it right.Thanks for your help. Hace you thought trying industrial hemp? I read is fantastic for replacing hay and for mulching! Not expensive at all. Research it and let me know. I wish I had land but I am a balcony gardener :-). Blessings! To supply nitrogen – I have fond memories of my Dad planting his blue lupin cover crop in our vegetable garden. I was paid ten cents an hour to chop up and turn in this dense, metre-high mass. A few weeks later the soil was churning with happy earthworms and our nitrogen-rich soil was ready to plant. Legumes, like lupins, clovers and lucerne, fix nitrogen from the atmosphere and deliver this desirable ammonium form of nitrogen into the root zone. The ideal ratio between ammonium and nitrate nitrogen is 3:1 (in favour of ammonium nitrogen) and this ratio is a big player in pest resistance. You may struggle to achieve this resilience ratio in your garden without some legumes present in the planting mix. Reader points out the benefits of the banana slugs in gardens My heirloom tomatoes looked just like this in my garden this year! Unfortunately, I agree with your “detective work” and conclusions. I don’t know if the source of the toxicity was from my mulch, straw/hay mulch, or drift from surrounding farm crop fields. My overall garden was pretty much a failure this year, despite good weather conditions, multiple plantings, and good care. I’m obviously going to have to do something different next year…not sure what! Thanks for sharing your experiences, please keep us posted! Question 3 is something that I’m starting to see as the bridge between “Length 12” and “Length x” from the original problem statement.  If you can do it with 1000, then you can do it with x.  Question 6 was also nice because some students used their formula to show that the garden length would not be a whole number if it used 2011 tiles, while other students made the reasonable observation that every garden tile number is even. I keep reading everyone’s posts because I thought I was the only one with strange results. I also am interested in hearing about other woodchippers. I have the following comments to add: 1. I’ve been a woodchipper (Paul Gautschi, Back to Eden) for three years now and every year the soil gets better as the plants reveal…but one has to be patient with the process, like investing over the years before payoff. Once payoff happens (the right balance of soil chemistry with microorganisms), less work and more productivity is expected. So fertilize your plants to compensate before that magic year which I will be doing in my fourth year. 2. I didn’t plant my tomatoes deeply enough below the 4″ woodchip layer — my mistake — and my results were very disappointing with curly leaves, too much die off. I put new plants in at the beginning of August at a deep level, and they’re doing well, except yellowing at bottom…we haven’t had much rain here. 3. my potatoes are doing excellent — buried deep below the chips. 4. Chips are challenging with root crops while the soil is still building, so I’m doing a garden bed without chips next year and for several years more. 5. there is definitely a larger picture in which the pollution of our skies and water is a factor, which makes me want to stick with chips for greater protection, though our productivity may still be affected. The pollution dries out the soil and hurts plant growth. 6, yes I think one has to do their best to avoid chips which were herbicide-treated before cut down. 7. I would like to get chickens to help with the gardening tilling and fertilizing. In keeping with the constraint of a non-authoritative personality (Table 1: ISC2), The Idea Garden communicates its suggestions via a non-authoritative character we call the Gardening Consultant (Fig. 3). Imbuing such characters with a personality can evoke emotions in the user, such as humor, appreciation or social feelings, and when such emotions are positive, they can enhance the quality and creativity of users’ ideas (Lewis et al., 2011; Nass and Moon, 2000). Also, a recent study showed that end-user programmers respond well to instructions given in a non-authoritarian voice (Lee and Ko, 2011). Therefore, the Gardening Consultant’s icon looks like a tentative, quizzical face, intended to provoke mild humor. Some of the suggestions also contain questions, to reinforce this non-authoritarian personality. The Gardening Consultant understands the user’s problems in CoScripter about as much as a teacher gardener understands problems in a student gardener’s garden: a lot in general, but not that much about that particular student’s soil, neighboring plants, resident insects, etc. Stewart acknowledged some parts of the garden are overgrown and said she already had plans to address the issues this week.  Everything looked fine when I first put them in the garden. I planted my tomatoes (Amish Paste) in a new spot this year– normally they are along my fence, but this year, I had more plants so I stuck them in the area I usually plant my onions. I mulched them and watered them, and sat back to watch them grow. Hello, I have watched a video called “Back to Eden”, and thought you might be interested in it as a new way to mulch your garden. I am soon going to implement this new way of gardening. I found this video on Mercola.com. This video is a no till approach and keeps all living organisms in the soil. So you will have healthier plants. 600px wide Solution: Don’t fight the rocks; design a rock garden. Rocks add visual appeal and function to anchor the soil. Plant rock crevices with drought-tolerant plants such as ice plant and sedum as a form of xeriscaping. Remedies: Mild to moderately over-fertilized plants may be able to be saved by flooding the garden bed with water to push the fertilizer deep into the soil. Severely burnt plants may never recover, so if it’s early in the growing season you may want to compost them and replant. Visit http://www.jandjacres.net for more hobby farm activities. We have been having a problem with our cucumber plant. The plant started out kind of slow. At first it even seemed to refuse to climb. However, that changed, and suddenly it was taking over a huge section of our garden fence. For a few weeks, things were great, more and more blooms, more and more climbing. Then, suddenly, leaves started turning yellow, then brown. It all seemed to radiate from the base of the plant. After posting pictures of the problem on our Facebook page, the best advise was that a vine borer had got into it and to take it out before it hatched its eggs. So that is what I did. I tore it down, pulled it up, and split it open. You know what I found? The inside of a cucumber vine. That’s it. No bugs, no holes. Tonus Fortis Maxman vigrx VigRX Plus TestX Core Eron Plus Penigen 500 Masculin Active BioBelt VigRX Plus

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