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600px wide If you find you are having trouble with your garden, consider whether you’re making one of the above mistakes. It is always a good idea to consult with your local gardening center or any green thumbs you know if you are having a problem with your garden. A garden can be an extremely rewarding, relaxing activity once you have everything set up properly But gardens also provide a safe place for rodents, giving them shelter and readily available food sources.  To manage pests and nurture bees – plants like mustard and marigolds are very effective in countering the most destructive of all crop pests, root knot nematodes. Brassicas emit biochemicals from their roots, which can reduce root disease in other food crops. However, it is important to rotate brassica plantings in your garden with other species to avoid a buildup of these chemicals. Cover crops can also serve as trap crops for pests to keep them away from your vegetables. Alternatively, they can also be host plants for beneficial predators. Flowering cover crops can also attract and feed pollinators. This will boost production in your garden while feeding the all-important honey bee. These creatures are really struggling around the globe at present. A condition called Colony Collapse Disorder is decimating beehives, to the point that beekeeping is no longer a viable profession in some regions. Insecticides called neonicotinoids, GMO crops and electromagnetic radiation from phone towers seem to have combined to mess up the immunity and communication skills of these critically important creatures. Einstein suggested that the world lasts just four years in the absence of the honey bee and their pollination gift. Your garden can serve as a chemical-free haven, to help preserve our bees. I am turning 70 in a few months and Hubs is 74. So it may be that we are more susceptible than you younger gardeners. But it turns out oak leaves harbor mites, and we have been bitten by them. I had a terrible time with what I thought was chiggers in the garden, worse than I could remember since we started gardening here in 2011. And now I have a rash on my leg I cannot get to go away. I’ve been researching and I think that one of two things have happened: 1) I am being bitten by oak mites and not chiggers, and they are triggering an allergy of some kind; and/or 2) I have gotten fungus on my hands from the wood chip pile, and then scratched my chigger (or mite, whichever) bites, thus allowing the fungus to get into my skin. Hubs has had a rash on one of his legs for about six months. We’ve shown our rashes to doctors and they say, “contact dermatitis”. Though the ointments they prescribe do not help. Hubs had an additional problem in that he was shoveling wood chips from the pile and got in a cloud of “dust” which must’ve been fungal in nature. All night that night, he hacked and coughed. Fortunately, those symptoms were gone by morning, and he has since had a chest xray as the normal part of a checkup and everything was ok. But it was kind of scary. We’ll be going back to the doctor and telling them what we think might be causing our rashes now, since doctors these days won’t waste their time doing any detective work and it’s just all too easy to lump every skin problem into “contact dermatitis” and send the patient away. The only problem is, we have to wait almost a month to get in to see the doctor. Sheesh. So much can happen in a month. So I’m trying to think about what I might try in the meantime. Maybe tea tree oil, neat? This sounds like a wonderful book. I would love to add it to my treasured gardening books. My garden is not relaxing 300px wide Luba thinks about watering her garden. The garden can be represented as a segment of length k. Luba has got n buckets, the i-th bucket allows her to water some continuous subsegment of garden of length exactly ai each hour. Luba can’t water any parts of the garden that were already watered, also she can’t water the ground outside the garden. Hi Jill, I am new to Prairie Homestead, maybe a month or so. I have just had the time to sit down and start to catch up on all the info in your tool boxes ( we have just had our first snow/blizzard here in Tea, SD, so officially done with the garden.) I can now sit and rest a while :). I was just reading about your tomato catastrophe, so sorry. It is so hard to watch your hard work curl up and die and then not know why. I was wondering if you have ever used worm castings (Poo). My husband and I started using it about 3 years ago. Our gardens are the best they have ever been. Its 100%pure, OMRI certified.You can’t burn your vegetation, its safe around children and animals, heck you could eat it if you wanted to-my husband tried- he’s weird 🙂 It is an excellent soil builder also. I’m going to do something here, hope its OK. This is our side business now. We took a full growing season to test it out for ourselves before we made up our minds to sell it as whole sale distributors. Anyway this may be something you may want to check out. We use it with our composted leaves and grass clippings. I can not remember the last time we even entertained the idea of using any kind of harmful chemical on anything in & around our yard and gardens. We have read so much about this and it really hits home, knowing what goes into your body is just 1/2 the fight and you have to stay ever so vigilant. Well I hope that I was somewhat helpful for you. If you would like any information about Worm poop, I will send you a website so you can check it out for yourself. Wishing you & yours Good Luck in the next growing season. Shawn PS.I enjoy the rest during this time of year but I’m already thinking/planning my garden plots out for next year 😉 Finally, an answer to what happened to me this year. I had a beautiful bed of over 6′ tomato plants in my 6×6 garden I had carefully filled with rich earth composted in with commercial manure sold locally only to have them start with the curling leaves and withered plants. No insect damage, no sign of over watering or blight, just green withered leaves. Never happened before, blamed it on plants being diseased from purchase but had several different varieties. Now after reading all this info I have a different perspective. Not sure I’ll try again next year but if I do, I’ll certainly research back to this blog. Thank you for posting. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/using-salt-to-kill-weeds.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/weeds/what-is-flame-weeding-information-on-flame-weeding-in-gardens.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/weeds/conventional-weed-killers.htm https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/weed-it-and-reap-how-to-make-your-garden-more-appealing-without-chemicals.htm Dear Real Living: I read with significant consternation the Friday, Jan. 17, article headlined « Prevent a garden slugfest with baits, maintenance. » Perhaps my having attended Pentacle Theatre’s production of « Dr. Doolittle » inspired me to point out a gross injustice. The article itself was fine, but the accompanying photo clearly pictured a Pacific banana slug (Ariolimax columbianus). This species, by far the largest and most obvious slug in our parts, is NOT a garden pest. These critters feed on detritus and dead plant material, not on living vegetation. As such, they actually help clean up our yards, not exfoliate them. Unfortunately, the SJ article will most certainly encourage people not aware of these slugs’ good intentions to dispatch them at every opportunity. Bad for the garden, truly tragic for the banana slugs. — Alex Bourdeau, West Salem Masculin Active Eron Plus VigRX Plus Testogen erozon max Maca peruana power up premium deseo power up premium Maca peruana

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