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Don’t let aphids ruin your garden. Use these tips to keep your plants safe. I keep reading everyone’s posts because I thought I was the only one with strange results. I also am interested in hearing about other woodchippers. I have the following comments to add: 1. I’ve been a woodchipper (Paul Gautschi, Back to Eden) for three years now and every year the soil gets better as the plants reveal…but one has to be patient with the process, like investing over the years before payoff. Once payoff happens (the right balance of soil chemistry with microorganisms), less work and more productivity is expected. So fertilize your plants to compensate before that magic year which I will be doing in my fourth year. 2. I didn’t plant my tomatoes deeply enough below the 4″ woodchip layer — my mistake — and my results were very disappointing with curly leaves, too much die off. I put new plants in at the beginning of August at a deep level, and they’re doing well, except yellowing at bottom…we haven’t had much rain here. 3. my potatoes are doing excellent — buried deep below the chips. 4. Chips are challenging with root crops while the soil is still building, so I’m doing a garden bed without chips next year and for several years more. 5. there is definitely a larger picture in which the pollution of our skies and water is a factor, which makes me want to stick with chips for greater protection, though our productivity may still be affected. The pollution dries out the soil and hurts plant growth. 6, yes I think one has to do their best to avoid chips which were herbicide-treated before cut down. 7. I would like to get chickens to help with the gardening tilling and fertilizing. We’re in a new build house and are now outside of our warranty (by over 12 months). The garden has been an issue since we moved in (2012) specifically with drainage. Whilst in the warranty, we had the drainage re done and this was eventually completed in spring 2015 (outside warranty but delayed on new build company’s part due to waiting for warmer weather and deadlines on the new houses on the estate). Fast forward a year, the garden still doesn’t drain properly. We’ve got in a professional to give us a quote on sorting it and was willing to pay ourselves to get it sorted. It’s come back at £7k to fix and landscape it better than what it’s been done when we first moved in. Landscaper is suggesting that the soil is the problem and the drainage not being right. I was willing to pay a bit to sort it but now I’m annoyed that we’ve paid all this money for a house and basically haven’t got what we want; what’s worse, we need to pay around £7k to fix without adding any value. Have we got a legal case to take this back to the new build company? I hear from neighbours that they’ve got similar problems with drainage and gardens being ruined, but not sure if we individually have a case, or if we have a collective claim as it seems that when they’ve developed the site, they’ve not accounted for the fact they’re building into a hill. The drainage is shocking. I’m pissed off as this was our « dream home » and for 3 years we haven’t had a proper garden. Any recommendations of solicitors who deal with this kind of thing would be very welcome. We all lead pretty busy lives these days and between juggling our work, family, sporting and social lives we’re left with little time for the things such as gardening, baking or even getting a good homemade meal on the table. Hi Jill, I am new to Prairie Homestead, maybe a month or so. I have just had the time to sit down and start to catch up on all the info in your tool boxes ( we have just had our first snow/blizzard here in Tea, SD, so officially done with the garden.) I can now sit and rest a while :). I was just reading about your tomato catastrophe, so sorry. It is so hard to watch your hard work curl up and die and then not know why. I was wondering if you have ever used worm castings (Poo). My husband and I started using it about 3 years ago. Our gardens are the best they have ever been. Its 100%pure, OMRI certified.You can’t burn your vegetation, its safe around children and animals, heck you could eat it if you wanted to-my husband tried- he’s weird 🙂 It is an excellent soil builder also. I’m going to do something here, hope its OK. This is our side business now. We took a full growing season to test it out for ourselves before we made up our minds to sell it as whole sale distributors. Anyway this may be something you may want to check out. We use it with our composted leaves and grass clippings. I can not remember the last time we even entertained the idea of using any kind of harmful chemical on anything in & around our yard and gardens. We have read so much about this and it really hits home, knowing what goes into your body is just 1/2 the fight and you have to stay ever so vigilant. Well I hope that I was somewhat helpful for you. If you would like any information about Worm poop, I will send you a website so you can check it out for yourself. Wishing you & yours Good Luck in the next growing season. Shawn PS.I enjoy the rest during this time of year but I’m already thinking/planning my garden plots out for next year 😉 The best way to maintain a healthy garden is to educate yourself and learn to identify common “bad bugs.” Inspect your garden regularly to detect problems early. The sooner a pest is identified the easier it will be to manage using earth-friendly methods. Below we’ve listed several garden invaders that you may encounter. Click on each pest picture for a description and our list of organic remedies. I container gardening last year adding some more this spring. I would love to have a vegetable/fruit garden in the yard, however, due a neighbor’s tree I only have a large root and hard, dry compacted dirt. I’m Ohio, with extremely unpredictable weather. ANY input is welcome on how to start this garden and the soil prep. Epson salt provides the plant with the magnesium it needs to produce the “green” in the leaves. Put a small circle of ES around the plant. Don’t forget to water it in. That way the plant can take what it needs when it needs it. I use the triage method and cut those dead or dying leaves off the plant. With regards to my tomato plants this year, I cut off leaves at the lower end of the plant and buried the roots deeper then before. In some cases I planted the stem of the plant on it’s side. This way it gave the plant more area to produce roots. You should see the stems this season,larger then I’ve seen before. Two fingers thick, easily. With regards to the mulching,I was told that saw dust robbed the soil of nitrogen. However are saying that and purchasing a truck load we were committed to using the saw dust and continue to do so. Saw no evidence of that happening. Mulching still keeps the weeds down to a min, as well as protecting our plants from the hot sun. We have raised beds and at least half of the bed is composed of leaves from our back yard We use compost that was a 50/50 mix of leaves and grass,then topped it off with a 0.05 mixture of compost and manure. Then we added an evergreen mixture of top soil to bring the level of the soil to our desired level. I know everyone has their preferences, but we use miracle-grow once a week and our garden is thicker,greener and taller every year. We also have started to make a compost tea. We’ll get back with those results later on. One other thought,at the end of last years season we took what was left from our compost pile and spread it over our raised beds. We think that has helped out too. While it seems that extra work has paid off in that area of gardening soil development, garden pest such as Japanese beetles are eating up our rose bush’s,blackberries and now they are visiting our green bean plants. Hand picking was fine when there was a few, but this year they brought there whole family for a visit. FYI- Hand picking, Shop van and neeme oil. beginning in the morning. Some success. This year we introduced 1500 ladybugs into our garden. We also left alone wasp,bees,spiders and grasshoppers. Need to keep an open eye on the leaf hoppers! Want to keep the garden chemical free as much as we can. Did not mean for this to be so long,sorry about that. Anyway good luck and good gardening to you all from Southern Patriots Victory gardens in the homeland of America. Be prepared for what’s to come! Good Day mate ! SP Penigen 500 BioBelt Eron Plus TestX Core Zevs el macho Eron Plus BeMass el macho Testo Ultra

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