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My garden is like a bog I, too, know your pain and despair. We live on the western edge of Wyoming at 6000′. Our sons raise cattle, so left-over hay and manure from the cows and horses was easy to obtain. About mid way through the 2014 gardening season, after mulching my peas they just stopped. Hmm, must have been the heat. The beans were just a fair crop that year. 2015, no potatoes, no beans, no peas. They all came up beautifully, but when they started to put out roots – they became stunted, yellowed, twisted, and eventually died. The corn wasn’t bothered. Nor the pumpkin. I thought slugs, virus, disease, too much water. By the end of 2015, research was pointing to contamination. This year, began the same way. Transplants were healthy until put into the garden. Seeds germinate then look awful. After much research – I stopped using the manure tea (it seemed to be the worst culprit – maybe because it is concentrated). Planted all the radish seed I had. The ones I didn’t pick are the size of large potatoes and up to 4′ tall. Started more brassica transplants and planted them all over the garden. Interestingly, where I planted radishes or brassicas next to the peas, the peas actually produced a few peas and did not die immediately. Also, putting fermented molasses water on the potatoes seemed to help a little. We are now looking at cover crops as a way to help remediate. And all the wood stove ash will be dumped in the garden this winter. Healthy growth is the mainstay of every garden. Why design something that looks great on the drawing board but fails to provide the right environment for plants to thrive? You end up wasting time, money, energy and possibly even harming your garden environment. When growing food indoors, you place your seeds or plants in planters or pots and use high quality soil that you can buy at the farmers market or in any home improvement store or gardening center. By far the most important part of growing plants indoors is to keep your plants in a sunny place. Healthy soil, adequate water and plenty of natural light will ensure that your vegetables thrive and have a bountiful harvest. I was informed of such a possibility two years ago when I tried to straw bale garden and it was an epic flop. I was told to use alfalfa hay only as that is obviously not sprayed with a broadleaf herbicide. Try that! but the metals get into our water supply so now we need filters to water the garden… not sure how to do that yet. We’re in a new build house and are now outside of our warranty (by over 12 months). The garden has been an issue since we moved in (2012) specifically with drainage. Whilst in the warranty, we had the drainage re done and this was eventually completed in spring 2015 (outside warranty but delayed on new build company’s part due to waiting for warmer weather and deadlines on the new houses on the estate). Fast forward a year, the garden still doesn’t drain properly. We’ve got in a professional to give us a quote on sorting it and was willing to pay ourselves to get it sorted. It’s come back at £7k to fix and landscape it better than what it’s been done when we first moved in. Landscaper is suggesting that the soil is the problem and the drainage not being right. I was willing to pay a bit to sort it but now I’m annoyed that we’ve paid all this money for a house and basically haven’t got what we want; what’s worse, we need to pay around £7k to fix without adding any value. Have we got a legal case to take this back to the new build company? I hear from neighbours that they’ve got similar problems with drainage and gardens being ruined, but not sure if we individually have a case, or if we have a collective claim as it seems that when they’ve developed the site, they’ve not accounted for the fact they’re building into a hill. The drainage is shocking. I’m pissed off as this was our « dream home » and for 3 years we haven’t had a proper garden. Any recommendations of solicitors who deal with this kind of thing would be very welcome. We luckily have a source that swears they assay each load of compost before they use in the 3- and 4-way garden soil mixes. We used them again this year when we remade the front yards raised beds. Everything we planted flourished. Large front gardens: what’s the point? I have trouble with weeds and brush in the garden. I hope this book could help me with these problem Creating a two-level garden linked by steps and flanked by split-level pools fed with waterfalls gives the space more interest. The design is bordered by raised flowerbeds and built-in bench seating, which can seat more guests than garden chairs. A colourful buddleia is an ideal standard plant for this kind of garden; easy to care for, it will attract lots of bees and butterflies when it flowers. The most important benefit of fungi, however, is their capacity to create crumb structure in your soil. This is the most desirable characteristic for garden soils. A soil with crumb structure can breathe freely while allowing ease of root growth and ideal water infiltration. Earthworms move unimpeded through these aggregates, as do beneficial nematodes and microarthropods. You can plunge your hands deep into this medium and it smells good enough to eat. Gardening is pure pleasure when you have achieved this holy grail of good soil management, but it is not possible without nurturing your fungal workforce. Life Force® Instant Humus™ involves super-concentrated soluble humic acid granules. Two teaspoons of these black crystals are added to a watering can full of water, and applied to 10 m2 of soil. You will almost hear your fungi rejoice! I use blackcat firecrackers to scare off strays, possums, etc. Maybe they will work for deer also? Also, I mulched my garden 2 years ago and everything died. I was told mulching robbed it of it’s nitrogen. This year I shoveled in a truckload of mushroom compost and it is still not doing well. I suppose next I’ll have to plant a bunch of clover to restore the nitrogen. Reader points out the benefits of the banana slugs in gardens These articles have some garden design ideas for you. My garden is like a bog Extractive agriculture has seen the long-term, persistent removal of these broad spectrum trace minerals with no replacement. In fact, it could be argued that most plants no longer have the associated hormonal support to achieve their genetic potential. The exception is the seaweed plant, which exists in a soup comprising the perfect balance of all minerals. Consequently, this plant contains forty times more of these hormonal helpers than land plants. What does this mean for this sea plant? Well, it is the fastest-growing plant on the planet, producing 30 cm of new growth every day. We can boost our hormone-deficient, garden plants with seaweed fertiliser. In this context, kelp becomes an essential supplement for a healthy, vigorous, food-producing garden. Office hours: 9-5:30pm Mon-Fri; 9-4pm Sat; Closed Sun (but if the weather is really lovely – we’re probably all out in the sunshine gardening, so please leave a message). As you can see from the attached photos, we require some privacy by the low fence, but would like to keep the garden bed as you approach from the street side (seen on the right in the photograph). We’re not worried about keeping the grass – paving and gravel are fine. We look forward to seeing what you can come up with for us. Joan and Jim Gooch, Tauranga BeMass Testo Ultra Testo Ultra VigRX Eron Plus Penigen 500 Testogen Zevs Atlant Gel mochoman

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